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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 11 years (captivity)
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Distribution

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Continent: Middle-America
Distribution: SE Mexico (Tamaulipas, Chiapas, Oaxaca), Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama; elevation: 120-940 m flavimaculatum: Atlantic slopes from S Veracruz to British Honduras, excluding the northern part of the Yucatán Peninsula. Veracruz, Tabasco, Chiapas. Terra typica restricta (H. M. SMITH & TAYLOR 1950): Río de la Pasión, Petén Province, Guatemala. obscurum: Panama, Costa Rica;
Type locality: Rio Chilibrillo, Panama. tenebrarum: Tamaulipas
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Yellow-spotted tropical night lizard

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The yellow-spotted tropical night lizard[2] or yellow-spotted night lizard (Lepidophyma flavimaculatum) is a species of night lizard.[1][3] It is distributed from central Mexico through the Central America south to Panama. It includes four subspecies:[3]

  • Lepidophyma flavimaculatum flavimaculatum
  • Lepidophyma flavimaculatum ophiophthalmum
  • Lepidophyma flavimaculatum tehuanae
  • Lepidophyma flavimaculatum tenebrarum

Reproduction

It reproduces parthenogenetically,[1] and gives birth to fully developed young lizards.[1]

Habitat and ecology

It is a secretive, terrestrial and nocturnal lizard of tropical wet and moist forests. Mostly found on the ground, it is occasionally found on tree trunks or beneath bark on standing trees. It feeds on small invertebrates.[1]

Fiction

The yellow-spotted night lizard is the inspiration for the lizards of the same name in the children's novel Holes (novel) by Louis Sachar. However, in the making of the movie adaptation of the novel, they used bearded dragons and painted yellow spots on them, rather than using actual yellow-spotted night lizards. In both versions, the lizards are portrayed as animals that are aggressive toward humans and produce deadly venom. Within the plot of the story, a bite from one is described as "the worst thing that can happen to you". This depiction, however, is not accurate to the animal in real life, which is neither venomous or aggressive.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Sunyer, J., Chaves, G., Porras, L.W., Lamar, W. & Solórzano, A. (2013). "Lepidophyma flavimaculatum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2013: e.T197495A2490538. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2013-2.RLTS.T197495A2490538.en.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  2. ^ "SPECIES Lepidophyma flavimaculatum". UniProt. Retrieved 9 May 2011.
  3. ^ a b Lepidophyma flavimaculatum at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database. Accessed 17 October 2015.
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Yellow-spotted tropical night lizard: Brief Summary

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The yellow-spotted tropical night lizard or yellow-spotted night lizard (Lepidophyma flavimaculatum) is a species of night lizard. It is distributed from central Mexico through the Central America south to Panama. It includes four subspecies:

Lepidophyma flavimaculatum flavimaculatum Lepidophyma flavimaculatum ophiophthalmum Lepidophyma flavimaculatum tehuanae Lepidophyma flavimaculatum tenebrarum
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