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Brief Summary

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Acropora hyacinthus is a coral that forms large, low, roughly circular tables or semi-circular brackets. It has a fairly variable form, mostly due to its very wide range of habitats. In turbulent water it forms solid, heavy sheets with stunted vertical branchlets (it is found in very rough water), and in sheltered conditions its branchlets become longer, slender and more separate. This species is one of the most abundant corals of exposed outer reef slopes of much of the western Pacific. It was found at six of six regions in Indonesia. Found at 40 sites of 87 sites surveyed in the Marshall Islands.

Acropora hyacinthus

provided by wikipedia EN

Acropora hyacinthus is a species of acroporid coral found from the Indian Ocean, the Indo-Pacific waters, southeast Asia, Japan, the East China Sea and the western Pacific Ocean. It lives on shallow reefs on upper reef slopes, and is found from depths of 1–25 m. Crown-of-thorns starfish preferentially prey upon Acropora corals. It was described by Nemenzo in 1971.

Description

Acropora hyacinthus occurs in plate- or table-shaped wide colonies that consist of a number of thin branches in a lattice structure. It has strongly inclined branchlets. This pale species contains incipient axial and axial corallites that cannot be distinguished, and its branchlets contain cup-shaped radial corallites. All corallites on specimens of Acropora hyacinthus are darker than the main branch structure. The species looks similar to Acropora cytherea.[2]

Distribution

Acropora hyacinthus is classed as a data deficient species on the IUCN Red List, but it is believed that its population is decreasing in line with the global decline in reefs, and it is listed under Appendix II of CITES. Figures of its population are unknown, but is likely to be threatened by the global reduction of coral reefs, the increase of temperature causing coral bleaching, climate change, human activity, the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) and disease.[1] It occurs at depths from 1 to 25 metres (3 ft 3 in to 82 ft 0 in) on the upper slopes of shallow reefs. It occurs in the Indian Ocean, the Indo-Pacific waters, southeast Asia, Japan, the East China Sea, Australia, and the western Pacific Ocean.[1]

Taxonomy

The species was originally described by James Dwight Dana in 1846 as Madrepora hyacinthus.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c Aeby, G.; Delbeek, J.T.; Lovell, E.R.; Richards, Z.T.; Reboton, C. & Bass, D. (2014). "Acropora bifurcata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2014: e.T133658A54302913. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2014-1.RLTS.T133658A54302913.en. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Acropora bifurcata". Australian Institute of Marine Species. Retrieved 14 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Acropora hyacinthus (Dana, 1846)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
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Acropora hyacinthus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Acropora hyacinthus is a species of acroporid coral found from the Indian Ocean, the Indo-Pacific waters, southeast Asia, Japan, the East China Sea and the western Pacific Ocean. It lives on shallow reefs on upper reef slopes, and is found from depths of 1–25 m. Crown-of-thorns starfish preferentially prey upon Acropora corals. It was described by Nemenzo in 1971.

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Biology

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bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
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Jacob van der Land [email]

Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
This forms large, low, roughly circular tables or semi-circular brackets. It has a fairly variable form, mostly due to its very wide range of habitats. In turbulent water it forms solid, heavy sheets with stunted vertical branchlets (it is found in very rough water), and in sheltered conditions its branchlets become longer, slender and more separate. All intermediate conditions are common. Its branches anastomose strongly such that central portions may be thick, unbroken sheets, especially in exposed locations, where the tables may touch the substrate and form several secondary points of attachment. In all cases, branchlets turn upwards vertically from the upper surface of the tables. They may show elongated axial corallites, or else the branchlet tips may terminate in "rosettes" of calices with no protuberant axial corallite. Both conditions usually occur in the same colonies. This species usually shows emerged, long and waving tentacles during the daytime. This species is commonest in less than 3 or 4 m depth, where it is a very consistent component of the surf zone on exposed reef crests. It shows highest cover values (of over 20%) in the roughest areas. However, it has a very wide distribution, and may be found in clear water and lagoonal areas to 35 m deep (Sheppard, 1998). Colonies are wide, flat tables which are thin and finely structured. Fine upward projecting branchlets have a rosette-like arrangement of radial corallites. Axial corallites are not exsert. Colour: uniform cream, brown or green with or without blue- or pink-growing margins. Abundance: one of the most abundant corals of upper reef slopes and outer reef flats (Veron, 1986). A tabular species with fine branches which project upwards. The radial corallites give the tips a rosette-like appearance. Colonies are often tiered. Colour: often brown. Habitat: reef slopes (Richmond, 1997).
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cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]