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Brief Summary

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The family Rhizophoraceae includes around 135 tropical (especially Old World) species of trees and shrubs placed in around 15 genera (Mabberley 2008). Although some are mangroves (around 18 species in four genera: Bruguiera, Ceriops, Kandelia, and Rhizophora), others are not--and some species from other families are mangroves as well. Thus, although Rhizophoraceae includes a number of important and widespread mangrove species, with viviparous seeds and aerial roots, it should not be thought of as "the mangrove family". The principal genera in Rhizophoraceae are Bruguiera, Carallia, Cassipourea, Ceriops, Crossostylis, Pellacalyx, and Rhizophora (Mabberley 2008). Rhizophora is the most conspicuous genus in tropical, coastal mangrove ecosystems (Cerón-Souza et al. 2010).

Both molecular phylogenetic analyses and analysis of floral structures indicate that the sister group to Rhizophoraceae is Erythroxylaceae (best known for the Erythroxylum species from which cocaine is derived) (Setoguchi et al. 1999; Matthews and Endress 2011 and references therein)

Juncosa and Tomlinson (1988) provided a thorough review of the taxonomic history of Rhizophoraceae to 1988. For up-to-date estimates of numbers of genera and species for Rhizophoraceae or other flowering plant families, as well as current information on relationships among flowering plant families, see the Angiosperm Phylogeny Website.

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Leo Shapiro
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Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Trees and shrubs. Leaves simple, opposite, rarely whorled, with interpetiolar stipules. Inflorescences axillary, of various types. Flowers bisexual (in ours), actinomorphic. Calyx gamosepalous; lobes 4-5(-7). Petals as many as calyx lobes and alternating with them, free. Stamens twice as many as petals or more. Ovary inferior to superior; style 1 (in ours). Fruit a berry, drupe or (in ours) a capsule. Seeds arillate.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
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Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Rhizophoraceae Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/family.php?family_id=196
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Rhizophoraceae

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The Rhizophoraceae are a family of tropical or subtropical flowering plants. Among the better-known members are mangrove trees of the genus Rhizophora. Around 147 species are distributed in 15 genera,[1] most native to the Old World.[2] Some species produce wood, used for underwater construction or piling, and tannins for leather making.

Description

These are woody plants with opposite or whorled leaves (but not decussate), with insect-pollinated flowers having a nectary disc and typically five petals. This family is now placed in the order Malpighiales, though under the Cronquist system, they formed an order in themselves (Rhizophorales).

These species are often hermaphrodites, more rarely polygamomonoecious. Mangrove species are usually viviparous while those living on land are not.

Genera

Family Rhizophoraceae consists of these genera:[3]

Uses

Apart from the ecosystem services provided by mangroves and the many native uses in food and medicine, several species are valuable sources of timber. This is particularly true of the mangrove species, whose wood, hard and dense but not very durable, is used mainly for underwater pilings, charcoal production and wood-fuel. Mangrove bark is also widely used in the preparation of leather in the tanning industry.[4]

References

  1. ^ Christenhusz, M. J. M., and Byng, J. W. (2016). "The number of known plants species in the world and its annual increase". Phytotaxa. Magnolia Press. 261 (3): 201–217. doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.261.3.1.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ Stephens, P.F. (2001 onwards). Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 9, June 2008. http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/Research/APweb/
  3. ^ "Rhizophoraceae — The Plant List". Theplantlist.org. Retrieved 2019-01-15.
  4. ^ Flowering Plants of the World by consultant editor Vernon H. Heywood, 1978, Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, England, ISBN 019217674-9

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Rhizophoraceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Rhizophoraceae are a family of tropical or subtropical flowering plants. Among the better-known members are mangrove trees of the genus Rhizophora. Around 147 species are distributed in 15 genera, most native to the Old World. Some species produce wood, used for underwater construction or piling, and tannins for leather making.

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