dcsimg

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Trees or shrubs, sometimes climbing. Stipules 0 or consisting of spines (Harrisonia). Leaves alternate, imparipinnate, lacking gland-dots; the rhachis sometimes winged. Inflorescence a panicle. Flowers unisexual or bisexual. Sepals 4-5, partly fused. Petals 4-5. Stamens 8-10 (in ours). Disk annular. Ovary superior, 4-5-locular, each loculus with 1(-2) ovule. Fruit (in ours) a 4-5-lobed depressed-spherical berry.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Simaroubaceae Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/cult/family.php?family_id=209
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Simaroubaceae

provided by wikipedia EN

The Simaroubaceae are a small, mostly tropical, family in the order Sapindales. In recent decades, it has been subject to much taxonomic debate, with several small families being split off. A molecular phylogeny of the family was published in 2007, greatly clarifying relationships within the family.[2] Together with chemical characteristics such as the occurrence of petroselinic acid in Picrasma[3] in contrast to other members of the family such as Ailanthus[4] this indicates the existence of a subgroup in the family with Picrasma, Holacantha, and Castela.

The best-known species is the temperate Chinese tree-of-heaven Ailanthus altissima, which has become a cosmopolitan weed tree of urban areas[5] and wildlands.[6]

Well-known genera in the family include the tropical Quassia and Simarouba.

Genera

Excluded genera

References

  1. ^ a b "Family: Simaroubaceae DC., nom. cons". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2003-01-17. Retrieved 2011-04-19..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Clayton, Joshua W.; Edwino S. Fernando; Pamela S. Soltis; Douglas E. Soltis (2007). "Molecular phylogeny of the tree-of-heaven family (Simaroubaceae) based on chloroplast and nuclear markers". International Journal of Plant Sciences. 168 (9): 1325–1339. doi:10.1086/521796.
  3. ^ Tsujimoto, M. and Koyanagi, H. (1933) Bull. Chem. Soc. Japan 8, 161
  4. ^ T. Stuhlfauth, H. Fock, H. Huber, K. Klug: The distribution of fatty acids including petroselinic and tariric acids in the fruit and seed oils of the Pittosporaceae, Araliaceae, Umbelliferae, Simarubaceae and Rutaceae. In: Biochemical Systematics and Ecology. 13, 1985, S. 447–453, doi:10.1016/0305-1978(85)90091-2.
  5. ^ http://www.hort.cornell.edu/uhi/research/articles/jeh4(1).pdf
  6. ^ Knapp, Liza B; Canham, Charles D (2000). "Invasion of an Old-Growth Forest in New York by Ailanthus altissima: Sapling Growth and Recruitment in Canopy Gaps". Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 127 (4): 307. doi:10.2307/3088649. JSTOR 3088649.
  7. ^ "GRIN Genera of Simaroubaceae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-04-19.
  8. ^ "GRIN genera sometimes placed in Simaroubaceae". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-04-19.

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wikipedia EN

Simaroubaceae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Simaroubaceae are a small, mostly tropical, family in the order Sapindales. In recent decades, it has been subject to much taxonomic debate, with several small families being split off. A molecular phylogeny of the family was published in 2007, greatly clarifying relationships within the family. Together with chemical characteristics such as the occurrence of petroselinic acid in Picrasma in contrast to other members of the family such as Ailanthus this indicates the existence of a subgroup in the family with Picrasma, Holacantha, and Castela.

The best-known species is the temperate Chinese tree-of-heaven Ailanthus altissima, which has become a cosmopolitan weed tree of urban areas and wildlands.

Well-known genera in the family include the tropical Quassia and Simarouba.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN