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Brief Summary

    Labiduridae: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia
    "Striped earwig" redirects here. This can also specifically refer to the Tawny Earwig (Labidura riparia).

    Labiduridae, whose members are known commonly as striped earwigs, is a relatively large family of earwigs in the suborder Forficulina.

Comprehensive Description

    Labiduridae
    provided by wikipedia
    "Striped earwig" redirects here. This can also specifically refer to the Tawny Earwig (Labidura riparia).

    Labiduridae, whose members are known commonly as striped earwigs,[2] is a relatively large family of earwigs in the suborder Forficulina.[1][3]

    Taxonomy

    The family contains a total of approximately 72 species, spread across seven genera in three subfamilies.[4][5] Some well-known members of the family include Labidura riparia, commonly known as the tawny earwig, and Gonolabidura meteor. The family is mostly cosmopolitan, so it can be found around the world.[5] At least two species have been described from middle Cretaceous aged Burmese amber, Myrrholabia and Zigrasolabis.[6]

    Description

    The family's members are moderate to large earwigs, and are cylindrically shaped with well-developed wings. They have especially long antennae, while some segments can be shorter, and large cerci.[4][5]

    Genera

    The family contains the following genera:[7]

    References

    1. ^ a b "Checklist for LABIDURIDAE". Australian Faunal Directory. Australia: Australian Government: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 2008-10-09. Retrieved 2009-06-27..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ "Discover Life - Dermaptera: Labiduridae - Common brown earwig, Striped earwigs". Discover Life. Retrieved 2009-06-27.
    3. ^ See first entry in external links section for reference.
    4. ^ a b Steinmann, H. (1989). "Dermaptera. Catadermaptera II". Das Tierreich. 105.
    5. ^ a b c "Family LABIDURIDAE". Australian Faunal Directory. Australia: Australian Government: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 2008-10-09. Retrieved 2009-06-27.
    6. ^ Engel, MS; Grimaldi, D (2014). "New mid-Cretaceous earwigs in amber from Myanmar (Dermaptera)". Novitates Paleoentomologicae. 6: 1–16.
    7. ^ Hopkins, H.; Maehr, M. D.; Haas, F.; Deem, L. S. "family Labiduridae Verhoeff, 1902". Dermaptera Species File. Retrieved 7 January 2017.