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Brief Summary

Comprehensive Description

    Conservation Status
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    This is a rarely encountered species, at the northern edge of its range in Alberta
    General Description
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    A medium to large-size (4.5-6.0 cm wingspan) narrow-winged diurnal moth. The forewings are light yellow-brown or greenish-brown, crossed by a wide dark brown median band, bordered on the outside edge by a light orange band, which in turn blends into a dark terminal border. The hindwings are orange bordered with black. The body is light yellow-brown.
    Life Cycle
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Juanita is another small colorful day-flying sphinx moth that may be found nectaring at flowers. Unlike most sphingid larvae, those of juanita lack an anal "horn". There is a single brood each year.
    Proserpinus juanita
    provided by wikipedia

    Proserpinus juanita (Juanita sphinx) is a moth of the family Sphingidae.[2] It is found from North Dakota south to Arizona and east to Missouri and Texas.

    Description

    The wingspan is 45–64 mm.

    Biology

    The larvae feed on Onagraceae species, including Oenothera, Gaura and Epilobium species

    References

    1. ^ "CATE Creating a Taxonomic eScience - Sphingidae". Cate-sphingidae.org. Archived from the original on 2012-11-05. Retrieved 2011-10-25..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Markku Savela (July 27, 2008). "Proserpinus genus". funet.fi. Retrieved 2009-03-16.

    Trophic Strategy
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    No Alberta data; elsewhere reported larval hosts include Evening Primrose (Oenothera sp.) and Willowherb (Epilobium sp.).

Distribution

    Distribution
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Juanita ranges from the grasslands of southern Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta south across the Great Plains to northern Mexico. In Alberta, it has been collected in the Grasslands region, in the Lethbridge and Drumheller areas.

Habitat

    Habitat
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Prairie roadsides and meadows.

Cyclicity

    Cyclicity
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Adults have been collected in Alberta from late May to July.