dcsimg

Comprehensive Description

    Distribution
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Across southern Canada from British Columbia to Nova Scotia, south to Florida, Texas, and Nevada.
    General Description
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    "The adult is easily recognized by the strongly sinuous margin of the costal margin. The forewing is light to dark purplish brown with darker fine brown to reddish brown thin lines and reticulations. The lines in the basal and median areas are more distinct than the others and sometimes border more darkly shaded areas. The edge of the costa and fringe is typically darker as well as a small thoracic scale tuft. The similar Choristoneura rosaceana has a less sinuous costa, is normally larger and has relatively longer wings with more distinct banding. The late instar larva is pale green with a faint darker green dorsal stripe and sparse long setae throughout. The head is black or brown and the thoracic shield is ringed with black or brown along the posterior and lateral edges that fades to green towards the anterior. The distinctive pupa is whitish green with dark bars on its back (Chapman & Lienk 1971)."
    Habitat
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Found mostly in the Prairies in Alberta, but can be found in many open or shrubby areas.
    Trophic Strategy
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Goldenrod (Solidago sp.), currants (Ribes sp.), Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.), Raspberry (Rubus sp.), Willow (Salix sp.), Cherry (Prunus sp.), Violet (Viola sp.), Strawberry (Fragraria sp.), plus other deciduous trees, shrubs, and forbs (Razowski 1977; Chapman & Lienk 1971).

Cyclicity

    Cyclicity
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Late June to July (Chapman & Lienk 1971).

Life Cycle

    Life Cycle
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The larva folds the edges of a leaf together to form a shelter (Razowski 1977). The larva probably over winters in the middle instars amongst leaf litter or in a hibernaculum on shrubs (Chapman & Lienk 1977).

Conservation Status

    Conservation Status
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Of no concern.