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Nail-tail wallaby
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The nail-tail wallabies (genus Onychogalea) are three species of macropod found in Australia. They are distinguished by a horny spur at the end of their tail. While the northern nail-tail wallaby is still common in the northern part of Australia,[1] the crescent nail-tail is now extinct,[2] and the bridled nail-tail is considered rare and endangered, with probably fewer than 1100 mature individuals in the wild.[3] Nail-tail wallabies are smaller than many other wallabies.[4]

Species

There are three species:[5]

References

  1. ^ International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources "Onychogalea unguifera", The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 2008
  2. ^ International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources "Onychogalea lunata", The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 2008
  3. ^ International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources "Onychogalea fraenata", The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 2008
  4. ^ Menkhorst, Peter (2001). A Field Guide to the Mammals of Australia. Oxford University Press. p. 124..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  5. ^ Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.
Extant Diprotodontia species
Suborder Vombatiformes
PhascolarctidaePhascolarctos Vombatidae
(Wombats)Vombatus Lasiorhinus
Suborder Phalangeriformes (Possums) (cont. below)
Phalangeridae
(including Cuscuses)Ailurops
(Bear cuscuses) Phalanger Spilocuscus Strigocuscus Trichosurus
(Brushtail possums) Wyulda Burramyidae
(Pygmy possums)Burramys Cercartetus
Suborder Phalangeriformes (Possums) (cont. above)
TarsipedidaeTarsipes PetauridaeDactylopsila Gymnobelideus Petaurus PseudocheiridaeHemibelideus Petauroides Petropseudes Pseudocheirus Pseudochirulus Pseudochirops AcrobatidaeAcrobates Distoechurus
Suborder Macropodiformes (cont. below)
Macropodidae
(includes Wallabies)Lagostrophus Dendrolagus
(Tree-kangaroos) Dorcopsis Dorcopsulus Lagorchestes Macropus
(includes Kangaroos
and Wallaroos)
Onychogalea
(Nail-tail wallabies) Petrogale
(Rock-wallabies) Setonix Thylogale
(Pademelons) Wallabia
Suborder Macropodiformes (cont. above)
PotoroidaeAepyprymnus Bettongia
(Bettongs) Potorous
(Potoroos) HypsiprymnodontidaeHypsiprymnodon


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Nail-tail wallaby: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

The nail-tail wallabies (genus Onychogalea) are three species of macropod found in Australia. They are distinguished by a horny spur at the end of their tail. While the northern nail-tail wallaby is still common in the northern part of Australia, the crescent nail-tail is now extinct, and the bridled nail-tail is considered rare and endangered, with probably fewer than 1100 mature individuals in the wild. Nail-tail wallabies are smaller than many other wallabies.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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d628b1670108ff64d79f1a786bc2ad67