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Blanus
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Blanus is a genus of amphisbaenians found in the Mediterranean region of Europe and North Africa.[2] Like other amphisbaenians, Blanus are specialized for a subterranean existence, with a long, slender body, reduced limbs, and rudimentary eyes. The skull is powerfully constructed, allowing the animal to push through soil to create a burrow. The jaws are well-developed, with large, recurved teeth and a pair of canine-like teeth in the upper jaw.

Five extant species are currently known. The relationships of Blanus to other worm-lizards are not clear. The genus was formerly included in the Amphisbaenidae. More recent analyses suggest that blanids are more primitive, and are either related to Bipes[3] or represent an even more ancient lineage.[4]

A number of fossils from Europe have been referred either to Blanus or to the Blanidae.[5]

Species

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Evolutionary tree of Blanidae; extinct species denoted with gray lines

The genus contains the following species:[6][7]

References

  1. ^ Wagler, J. 1830. Natürliches System der AMPHIBIEN, mit vorangehender Classification der SÄUGTHIERE und VÖGEL. Ein Beitrag zur vergleichenden Zoologie. Munich, Stuttgart, and Tübingen: J.G. Cotta. vi + 354 pp. + one plate. (Genus Blanus, p. 197).
  2. ^ Albert, E. M.; Zardoya, R.; García-París, M. (2007). "Phylogeographical and speciation patterns in subterranean worm lizards of the genus Blanus (Amphisbaenia: Blanidae)". Molecular Ecology. 16 (7): 1519–1531. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03248.x. PMID 17391273..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  3. ^ Vidal, N.; Azvolinsky, A.; Cruaud, C.; Hedges, S. B. (2007-12-11). "Origin of tropical American burrowing reptiles by transatlantic rafting". Biology Letters. 4 (1): 115–118. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0531. PMC 2412945. PMID 18077239.
  4. ^ Kearney, M.; Stuart, B. L. (2004). "Repeated evolution of limblessness and digging heads in worm lizards revealed by DNA from old bones". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 271 (1549): 1677–1683. doi:10.1098/rspb.2004.2771. PMC 1691774. PMID 15306287.
  5. ^ Augé, M. L. (2012). "Amphisbaenians from the European Eocene: A biogeographical review". Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. 92 (4): 425–443. doi:10.1007/s12549-012-0104-6.
  6. ^ Blanus at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database
  7. ^ Blanus Wikispecies.

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Blanus: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

Blanus is a genus of amphisbaenians found in the Mediterranean region of Europe and North Africa. Like other amphisbaenians, Blanus are specialized for a subterranean existence, with a long, slender body, reduced limbs, and rudimentary eyes. The skull is powerfully constructed, allowing the animal to push through soil to create a burrow. The jaws are well-developed, with large, recurved teeth and a pair of canine-like teeth in the upper jaw.

Five extant species are currently known. The relationships of Blanus to other worm-lizards are not clear. The genus was formerly included in the Amphisbaenidae. More recent analyses suggest that blanids are more primitive, and are either related to Bipes or represent an even more ancient lineage.

A number of fossils from Europe have been referred either to Blanus or to the Blanidae.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
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10f6f1fe4e9fe48f074a3c1f4777bc95