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Brief Summary
provided by EOL authors
Ants in the genus Pseudomyrmex have large eyes, a distinct postpetiole and a well developed sting. Species of Pseudomyrmex are predominantly arboreal, and they occur from southern United States to Argentina and Chile.
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3870710
Diagnostic Description
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Workers and queens of Pseudomyrmex ants are distinctive: the eyes are large, conspicuous and elongate (width of eye two thirds or less of length); the first antennal segment, or scape, is relatively short, less than three-quarters of head length; there is a well developed postpetiole (i.e., a second node-like structure at the "waist"); and a well developed sting. The pronotum and mesonotum of the worker are unfused, and freely articulate with one another. The basal margin of the mandible nearly always has a proximal tooth.
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3870711
Diagnostic Description
provided by Plazi (legacy text)

Ants in this predominantly Neotropical genus nest in hollow dead twigs and other preformed plant cavities. Two species occur in California: P.apache Creighton is widespread at middle and low elevations within the California floristic province, often nesting in branches of manzanita ( Arctostaphylos ), while P. pallidus (F. Smith) is confined to southern California.

Species identification: Ward (1985b). Additional references: Creighton (1953b, 1954), Peters (1997), Starks et al. (1998), Ward (1989a, 1990, 1993).

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bibliographic citation
Ward, P. S., 2005, A synoptic review of the ants of California (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)., Zootaxa, pp. 1-68, vol. 936
author
Ward, P. S.
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Plazi (legacy text)
ID
http://plazi.cs.umb.edu/exist/rest/db/taxonx_docs/getSPM.xq?render=xhtml&description=broad&associations=no&doc=21008_gg2_tx.xml#_Description_58_58
Diagnostic Description
provided by Plazi (legacy text)

Canindeyú (ALWC).

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bibliographic citation
Wild, A. L., 2007, A catalogue of the ants of Paraguay (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)., Zootaxa, pp. 1-55, vol. 1622
author
Wild, A. L.
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Plazi (legacy text)
ID
http://plazi.cs.umb.edu/exist/rest/db/taxonx_docs/getSPM.xq?render=xhtml&description=broad&associations=no&doc=21367_gg2_tx.xml#_Description_548_548
Diagnostic Description
provided by Plazi (legacy text)

Canindeyú (ALWC).

license
not applicable
bibliographic citation
Wild, A. L., 2007, A catalogue of the ants of Paraguay (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)., Zootaxa, pp. 1-55, vol. 1622
author
Wild, A. L.
original
visit source
partner site
Plazi (legacy text)
ID
http://plazi.cs.umb.edu/exist/rest/db/taxonx_docs/getSPM.xq?render=xhtml&description=broad&associations=no&doc=21367_gg2_tx.xml#_Description_549_549
Diagnostic Description
provided by Plazi (legacy text)

Canindeyú (ALWC).

license
not applicable
bibliographic citation
Wild, A. L., 2007, A catalogue of the ants of Paraguay (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)., Zootaxa, pp. 1-55, vol. 1622
author
Wild, A. L.
original
visit source
partner site
Plazi (legacy text)
ID
http://plazi.cs.umb.edu/exist/rest/db/taxonx_docs/getSPM.xq?render=xhtml&description=broad&associations=no&doc=21367_gg2_tx.xml#_Description_550_550
Pseudomyrmex
provided by wikipedia EN

Pseudomyrmex is a genus of stinging, wasp-like ants in the subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae. They are large-eyed, slender ants, found mainly in tropical and subtropical regions of the New World.

Distribution and habitat

Pseudomyrmex is predominantly Neotropical in distribution, but a few species are known from the Nearctic region.[4] Most species are generalist twig nesters, for instance, Pseudomyrmex pallidus may nest in the hollow stems of dead grasses, twigs of herbaceous plants, and in dead, woody twigs.[4] However, the genus is best known for several species that are obligate mutualists with certain species of Acacia.[5] Other species have evolved obligate mutualism with other trees; for example Pseudomyrmex triplarinus is obligately dependent on any of a few trees in the genus Triplaris.[6][7]

Species

References

  1. ^ "Genus: Pseudomyrmex". antweb.org. AntWeb. Retrieved 11 October 2013..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Bolton, B. (2014). "Pseudomyrmex". AntCat. Retrieved 3 July 2014.
  3. ^ Ward, P. S. (1990). "The ant subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Generic revision and relationship to other formicids". Systematic Entomology. 15 (4): 449–489. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.1990.tb00077.x.
  4. ^ a b Phillip S. Ward (1985). "The Neartic species of the genus Pseudomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)". Quaestiones Entomologicae. 21: 209–246.
  5. ^ Gómez-Acevedo, Sandra; Rico-Arce, Lourdes; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Magallón, Susana; Eguiarte, Luis E. Neotropical mutualism between Acacia and Pseudomyrmex: Phylogeny and divergence times. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 56 (2010) 393–408
  6. ^ Larrea-Alcázar, D. M. and J. A. Simonetti. (2007). Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?. Archived 2013-10-02 at the Wayback Machine. Acta Oecologica 32(1) 112–18.
  7. ^ Ward, Philip S. (1 August 1999). "Systematics, biogeography and host plant associations of the Pseudomyrmex viduus group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), Triplaris- and Tachigali-inhabiting ants". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 126 (4): 451–540. doi:10.1006/zjls.1998.0158.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN
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c354a49bfb799b522f723a1d30866ba2
Pseudomyrmex: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

Pseudomyrmex is a genus of stinging, wasp-like ants in the subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae. They are large-eyed, slender ants, found mainly in tropical and subtropical regions of the New World.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
ID
bf2e1ee1c2be29fbb6815e86f50eaad7