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Eupithecia
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Eupithecia is a large genus of moths of the family Geometridae. There are hundreds of described species, found in all parts of the world (45 in the British Isles alone), and new species are discovered on a regular basis.

Eupithecia species form the bulk of the group commonly known as pugs. They are generally small with muted colours and specific identification can be difficult. As a group they are easily identified by their narrow wings held flat at 90° to the body with the hindwings almost hidden behind the forewings.

The larvae of many species feed on the flowers and seeds of their food plants rather than the foliage. Many species have a very specific food plant. Some Hawaiian Eupithecia are predators of other insects (E. orichloris, E. staurophragma, E. scoriodes). They mimic twigs but when sensitive hairs on their backs are triggered, they quickly grab the insects touching them. The defensive behavior of snapping may have pre-adapted Hawaii's ancestral Eupithecia for shifting to predation from feeding on pollen. Also, insect predators that behave in this way are lacking in Hawaii's fauna.

Species

This is a list of all described species.

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Common pug, Eupithecia miserulata, feeding on Rudbeckia serotina

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J-K

L

M

N

O

P

Q-R

S

T

U-V

W-Z

Species of unknown status

  • Eupithecia lavicaria Fuchs, 1902 (syn: Eupithecia lavicata Prout, 1914), described from Norway.
  • Eupithecia minutana Treitschke
  • Eupithecia robusta Dietze, 1910

References

  • Chinery, Michael (1986). Collins Guide to the Insects of Britain and Western Europe (Reprinted 1991).
  • Savela, Markku. "Eupithecia Curtis, 1825". Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms. Retrieved March 26, 2018..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • Montgomery, S. L. (1983). "Carnivorous caterpillars: the behavior, biogeography and conservation of Eupithecia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in the Hawaiian Islands". GeoJournal. 7 (6): 549–556. doi:10.1007/BF00218529.
  • Skinner, Bernard (1984). Colour Identification Guide to Moths of the British Isles.

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Eupithecia: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

Eupithecia is a large genus of moths of the family Geometridae. There are hundreds of described species, found in all parts of the world (45 in the British Isles alone), and new species are discovered on a regular basis.

Eupithecia species form the bulk of the group commonly known as pugs. They are generally small with muted colours and specific identification can be difficult. As a group they are easily identified by their narrow wings held flat at 90° to the body with the hindwings almost hidden behind the forewings.

The larvae of many species feed on the flowers and seeds of their food plants rather than the foliage. Many species have a very specific food plant. Some Hawaiian Eupithecia are predators of other insects (E. orichloris, E. staurophragma, E. scoriodes). They mimic twigs but when sensitive hairs on their backs are triggered, they quickly grab the insects touching them. The defensive behavior of snapping may have pre-adapted Hawaii's ancestral Eupithecia for shifting to predation from feeding on pollen. Also, insect predators that behave in this way are lacking in Hawaii's fauna.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
ID
efeebffff59e5b3cc738a9f9c1a1eeaa