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Migration

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Amphidromous. Refers to fishes that regularly migrate between freshwater and the sea (in both directions), but not for the purpose of breeding, as in anadromous and catadromous species. Sub-division of diadromous. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.Characteristic elements in amphidromy are: reproduction in fresh water, passage to sea by newly hatched larvae, a period of feeding and growing at sea usually a few months long, return to fresh water of well-grown juveniles, a further period of feeding and growing in fresh water, followed by reproduction there (Ref. 82692).
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Biology

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Found in rivers (Ref. 4833).
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Importance

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fisheries: of no interest
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Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
Xenopterus naritus (Richardson)

The posteroventral portion of A 1β is expanded dorsally and originates from the roof of the orbit, while the dorsal head of A 2α extends posteriorly beyond the hyomandibular to the anterolateral face of the pterotic. A 2β is as for Colomesus, except that the frontal secondarily roofs the dilatator fossa, and some of the fibers arise from it. The levator arcus palatini inserts on the hyomandibular by a broad, flat aponeurosis.

The hyohyoidei adductores is poorly developed in the outer wall of the opercular cavity, but with the posterodorsal and posteroventral bundles still well developed near their origins. The halves of the sternohyoideus fuse in the anterior midline. A well-developed and distinct intermandibularis is present. It attaches in the fossa of the dentary below the insertion of A 2, lying anterodorsal to the angular.

Levatores externi II and III are fused, and levator internus II is not associated with transversus dorsalis II medially. Adductor I is small. The erectores dorsales and anales lie in a somewhat more lateral position than do the depressores dorsales and anales. Inclinatores anales are attached to the bases of the first and the twenty-first (twentieth in the 124 mm specimen) to twenty-eighth fin rays.

The obliquus inferioris does not separate from the obliquus superioris in the region of the anal fin, and there is thus no anteroventral section joining the fibers arising from the posteroventral tip of the postcleithrum. The posterodorsomedial bundle of fibers attaching to the haemal spine of the twelfth vertebra is absent. The extreme anteroventral fibers of the obliquus inferioris attach to the lateral face of the first branchiostegal ray. A small aponeurosis from the obliquus superioris attaches to the base of ray D 1. The hypochordal longitudinalis and flexor ventralis externus are as for Colomesus, and the transversus caudalis inserts on the bases of rays V 1–2.
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bibliographic citation
Winterbottom, Richard. 1974. "The familial phylogeny of the Tetraodontiformes (Acanthopterygii: Pisces) as evidenced by their comparative myology." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-201. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.155

Chonerhinos

provided by wikipedia EN

Chonerhinos naritus, the bronze pufferfish or yellow pufferfish,[1] is a species of pufferfish native to Southeast Asia, where mainly found in estuarine and coastal habitats.[2][3] This species grows to a length of 28.5 centimetres (11.2 in) TL,[4] but otherwise it generally resembles the smaller and more strictly freshwater Auriglobus pufferfish.[3] This predatory species feeds on other fish, crustaceans (both crabs and shrimp) and snails.[2]

Taxonomy

C. naritus is the only species in the genus Chonerhinos,[4] but the synonym Xenopterus was formerly used instead. At that point the genus name Chonerhinos was used for the species modestus and its relatives, but this was incorrect and they were moved to Auriglobus in 1999.[5]

Notes

  1. ^ Froese, R. and D. Pauly, Eds. Common names of Chonerhinos naritus. FishBase. 2011.
  2. ^ a b Abidin, M.; and A. Bintoro (2015). Kebiasaan Makan Alami Ikan Buntal Kuning (Chonerhinos naritus) di Estuari Sungai Indragiri, Riau. Buletin Teknik Litkayasa Sumber Daya dan Penangkapan 13(1): 11—14.
  3. ^ a b Roberts, Tyson R. (1982). The Southeast Asian freshwater pufferfish genus Chonerhinos (Tetraodontidae), with descriptions of new species. Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences 43: 1-16.
  4. ^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2017). "Chonerhinos naritus" in FishBase. March 2017 version.
  5. ^ Kottelat, M., (1999). Nomenclature of the genera Barbodes, Cyclocheilichthys, Rasbora and Chonerhinos (Teleostei: Cyprinidae and Tetraodontidae), with comments on the definition of the first reviser. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 47(2) 591-600.

References

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Chonerhinos: Brief Summary

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Chonerhinos naritus, the bronze pufferfish or yellow pufferfish, is a species of pufferfish native to Southeast Asia, where mainly found in estuarine and coastal habitats. This species grows to a length of 28.5 centimetres (11.2 in) TL, but otherwise it generally resembles the smaller and more strictly freshwater Auriglobus pufferfish. This predatory species feeds on other fish, crustaceans (both crabs and shrimp) and snails.

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