dcsimg
Glossodia
provided by wikipedia EN
For the suburb of Sydney in Australia, see Glossodia, New South Wales.


Glossodia, commonly known as waxlip orchids, was a genus of mostly purple orchids from Australia. The genus was first formally described in 1810 by the prolific Scottish botanist Robert Brown who published his description in Prodromus florae Novae Hollandiae.[1][2]

Only two species were recognised:[3]

In 2015, as a result of studies of molecular phylogenetics,[4] Mark Clements transferred the two Glossodia species to Caladenia.[1]

Although the change from Glossodia to Caladenia is recognised by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew,[5] "Glossodia" is still used by Australian herbaria, including the National Herbarium of New South Wales.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b "Glossodia". APNI. Retrieved 15 April 2017..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Brown, Robert (1810). Prodromus florae Novae Hollandiae. London. pp. 325–326. Retrieved 15 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Glossodia". Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney; plantnet. Retrieved 15 April 2017.
  4. ^ Clements, Mark A.; Howard, Christopher G.; Miller, Joseph T. (13 April 2015). "Caladenia revisited: Results of molecular phylogenetic analyses of Caladeniinae plastid and nuclear loci". American Journal of Botany. 102 (4): 581–597. doi:10.3732/ajb.1500021. PMID 25878091.
  5. ^ "Glossodia". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (WCSP). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Stub iconThis Orchidoideae-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
Stub iconThis Australian plant article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
ID
2d2308fb756e7477742101e988a83f37
Glossodia: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN
For the suburb of Sydney in Australia, see Glossodia, New South Wales.


Glossodia, commonly known as waxlip orchids, was a genus of mostly purple orchids from Australia. The genus was first formally described in 1810 by the prolific Scottish botanist Robert Brown who published his description in Prodromus florae Novae Hollandiae.

Only two species were recognised:

Glossodia major R.Br. now known as Caladenia major - waxlip orchid, native to Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia; Glossodia minor R.Br. now known as Caladenia minorata - small waxlip orchid, native to Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

In 2015, as a result of studies of molecular phylogenetics, Mark Clements transferred the two Glossodia species to Caladenia.

Although the change from Glossodia to Caladenia is recognised by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, "Glossodia" is still used by Australian herbaria, including the National Herbarium of New South Wales.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
ID
49cdbe4d3475d88c210a97f4e79aaa13