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Pomphorhynchidae

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Pomphorhynchidae is a family of parasitic worms from the order Echinorhynchida.

Species

Pomphorhynchidae has 5 genera which contain the following species:[1][a]

Longicollum Yamaguti, 1935

  • Longicollum alemniscus (Harada, 1935)
  • Longicollum cadenati Gupta & Naqvi, 1984
  • Longicollum chabanaudi Dollfus & Golvan, 1963
  • Longicollum dattai Saxena, Johri & Gupta, 2008
  • Longicollum edmondsi Golvan, 1969
  • Longicollum engraulisi Gupta & Fatma, 1985
  • Longicollum indicum Gupta & Gupta, 1970
  • Longicollum lutjani Jain & Gupta, 1980
  • Longicollum noellae Golvan, 1969
  • Longicollum pagrosomi Yamaguti, 1935

L. pagrosomi was found parasitizing the Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) in the bay of Gemlik, Turkey. The body was between 5036 and 10164 µm long and 478 and 878) µm wide. The proboscis was cylindrical, wider anteriorly, between 2310 and 5313 µm long, and armed with 11 or 12 rows of hooks comprising 11 to 13 hooks in each. The anterior hooks were smaller than the posterior, measuring 34 (24 – 42) µm, 42 (40 – 44) µm, to 61 (54 – 70) µm long. The short proboscis sac consisted of two membranes. The lemnisci were level with the proboscis. One immature male sample had two spherical testes, 216 × 272 µm in diameter. The copulatory bursa was 80 by 140 µm. The cement glands were indistinct. The eggs measured between 70 and 210 µm long and 17 and 52 µm wide.[2]

  • Longicollum psettodesai Gupta & Gupta, 1980
  • Longicollum quiloni Gupta & Naqvi, 1984
  • Longicollum riouxi Golvan, 1969

P. laevis is a parasitic acanthocephalan worm that can influence the reaction of its intermediate host, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex, to the smell of potential predators like perch, Perca fluviatilis.[3][4]

P. laevis facilitates its movement from its initial host. Research has demonstrated that organisms affected by the parasite exhibit a diminished or inverted avoidance response to the scent of predators when compared to uninfested specimens, supporting the notion that the parasite manipulates its host, with the goal of passing itself on to its definitive host, a freshwater fish. Affected specimens also demonstrate vibrant changes in color, making them more visible to predators.[5][6]

This worm swells its proboscis to press microneedles into the intestinal wall, with a very strong adhesive force. This has inspired a structural skin graft adhesive that sticks strongly but has minimal tissue damage while in place and upon removal.[7]

Tenuiproboscis Yamaguti, 1935

  • Tenuiproboscis bilqeesae Gupta & Naqvi, 1992
  • Tenuiproboscis clupei Gupta & Sinha, 1992
  • Tenuiproboscis edmondi Gupta & Naqvi, 1992
  • Tenuiproboscis ernakulensis Gupta & Naqvi, 1992
  • Tenuiproboscis guptai Gupta & Sinha, 1989
  • Tenuiproboscis keralensis Kaur, Shamal, Chandran, Binesh, Gishnu, Asokan & Sanil, 2017
  • Tenuiproboscis meyeri Saxena & Gupta, 2007
  • Tenuiproboscis misgurni Yamaguti, 1935

Notes

  1. ^ A binomial authority in parentheses indicates that the species was originally described in a genus other than the present genus.

References

  1. ^ https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=64313
  2. ^ Oğuz, M. C., & Kvach, Y. (2006). Occurrence of acanthocephalans in teleost fishes of Gemlik Bay, Sea of Marmara, Turkey. Helminthologia, 43(2), 103–108. url=https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/helm.2006.43.issue-2/s11687-006-0020-2/s11687-006-0020-2.pdf
  3. ^ Kullmann, Harald; Timo Thünken; Sebastian A Baldauf; Theo C M Bakker; Joachim G Frommen (2008). "Fish odour triggers conspecific attraction behaviour in an aquatic invertebrate". Biol. Lett. An der Immenburg 1, 53121, Bonn, Germany: University of Bonn, Institute for Evolutionary Biology and Ecology. 4 (5): 458–60. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2008.0246. PMC 2610077. PMID 18593668.CS1 maint: location (link)
  4. ^ Choi, Charles Q. (February 8, 2007). "Parasitic Worms Alter Hosts' Sense of Smell to Better Its Lot in Life". Fox News. Retrieved 2008-07-03.
  5. ^ Baldauf, Sebastian A.; Timo Thünken; Joachim G Frommen; Theo C M Bakker; Oliver Heupel; Harald Kullmann (2007). "Infection with an acanthocephalan manipulates an amphipod's reaction to a fish predator's odours". International Journal for Parasitology. An der Immenburg 1, D-53121 Bonn, Germany: University of Bonn, Institute for Evolutionary Biology and Ecology. 37 (1): 61–5. doi:10.1016/j.ijpara.2006.09.003. PMID 17049528.CS1 maint: location (link)
  6. ^ Bakker, Theo C.M.; Dominique Mazzi; Sarah Zala (June 1997). "Parasite Induced Changes in Behavior and Color Make Gammarus pulex More Prone to Fish Predation". Ecology. University of Bern, CH-3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland: Ecological Society of America. 78 (5): 1098–1104. doi:10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[1098:PICIBA]2.0.CO;2.CS1 maint: location (link)
  7. ^ Seung Yun Yang; et al. (April 2013). "A bio-inspired swellable microneedle adhesive for mechanical interlocking with tissue". Nature Communications. Massachusetts (mixed): Macmillan. 4 (1702): 1702. doi:10.1038/ncomms2715. PMC 3660066. PMID 23591869.
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Pomphorhynchidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Pomphorhynchidae is a family of parasitic worms from the order Echinorhynchida.

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