dcsimg

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Erect herbs. Stipules adnate to the petiole. Leaves alternate, imparipinnate; leaflets dentate. Inflorescences composed of spike-like racemes. Flowers 5-merous. Calyx with numerous hooked spines below the lobes. Petals 5, yellow. Disk annular. Stamens (in ours) 10-15. Carpels 2. Achenes usually 2, enclosed in the hardened calyx lobes which bears hooked prickles.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Agrimonia Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/genus.php?genus_id=656
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Agrimonia

provided by wikipedia EN

Agrimonia (from the Greek ἀργεμώνη),[1] commonly known as agrimony, is a genus of 12–15 species of perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the family Rosaceae,[1] native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between .5–2 m (1.6–6.6 ft) tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually unbranched) spike.

Agrimonia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including grizzled skipper (recorded on A. eupatoria) and large grizzled skipper.

Species

Uses

In the ancient times, it was used for foot baths and tired feet.[2] Agrimony has a long history of medicinal use. The English poet Michael Drayton once hailed it as an "all-heal" and through the ages it was considered a panacea. The ancient Greeks used agrimony to treat eye ailments, and it was made into brews for diarrhea and disorders of the gallbladder, liver, and kidneys. The Anglo-Saxons boiled agrimony in milk and used it to improve erectile performance.[3] They also made a solution from the leaves and seeds for healing wounds; this use continued through the Middle Ages and afterward, in a preparation called eau d'arquebusade, or "musket-shot water". It has been added to tea as a spring tonic.[2]

Folklore

Traditional British folklore states that if a sprig of Agrimonia eupatoria was placed under a person's head, they would sleep until it was removed.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Agrimony" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 1 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 424.
  2. ^ a b C. F. Leyel. Compassionate Herbs. Faber and Faber Limited.
  3. ^ Lacey, R. and Danziger, D. (1999) In The Year 1000 London: Little, Brown & Co, p. 126
  4. ^ Encyclopedia of Folk Medicine: Old World and New World Traditions by Gabrielle Hatfield, p.310
  • Eriksson, Torsten; Hibbs, Malin S.; Yoder, Anne D.; Delwiche, Charles F.; Donoghue, Michael J. (2003). "The Phylogeny of Rosoideae (Rosaceae) Based on Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA and the TRNL/F Region of Chloroplast DNA". International Journal of Plant Sciences. 164 (2): 197–211. doi:10.1086/346163.

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Agrimonia: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Agrimonia (from the Greek ἀργεμώνη), commonly known as agrimony, is a genus of 12–15 species of perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the family Rosaceae, native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between .5–2 m (1.6–6.6 ft) tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually unbranched) spike.

Agrimonia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including grizzled skipper (recorded on A. eupatoria) and large grizzled skipper.

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