Description

provided by eFloras
Shrubs low, ca. 1 m tall. Branches spreading or curved, glabrous; branchlets of present year purple-brown or red-brown; prickles dense to sparse, terete, straight or slightly curved, to 4 mm, fine, bristlelike, abruptly broadening at base, intermixed with smaller bristles. Leaves including petiole 4–8 cm; stipules mostly adnate to petiole, free part ovate, margin entire or serrate, teeth often glandular apically; rachis and petiole sparsely prickly and glandular-pubescent; leaflets (5–)7–9(–11), oblong, oblong-ovate, or suborbicular, 1–2.2 × 0.6–1.2 cm, glabrous, base rounded or broadly cuneate, margin simply serrate or partly doubly serrate, teeth glandular apically when young, apex rounded-obtuse or acute. Flowers solitary, or 2 or 3 and fasciculate, axillary, 2–6 cm in diam.; pedicel 1.5–3.5 cm, sparsely pubescent or glabrescent, glandular-pubescent or not; bracts absent. Hypanthium subglobose, glabrous. Sepals lanceolate, abaxially glabrous, adaxially pubescent, margin entire, apex acuminate or caudate-acuminate. Petals 5, white, pink, or yellowish, broadly obovate, base broadly cuneate, apex emarginate. Styles free, much shorter than stamens, pubescent. Hip black or dark brown, subglobose, 1–1.6 cm in diam., glabrous, shiny, with persistent sepals; pedicel to 4 cm, often glandular. Fl. May–Jun, fr. Oct–Sep.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 350 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Xinjiang [Russia (Siberia); C and SW Asia, Europe].
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 350 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

provided by eFloras
Scrub in forests, grassy slopes, river sides; 1100--2300 m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 350 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Rosa spinosissima L. Sp. PI. 49 1". 1753
Rosa cinnamomea L. Syst. Nat. ed. 10. 1062. 1759. Not R. cinnamomea L. 1753.
Stem slender, 1-2 m. high, brown, terete, armed with short curved prickles; floral branches 1-2 dm. long, often unarmed; stipules dilated, more or less convolute, about 2 cm. long, dentate on the margins, finely puberulent; rachis and petiole tomentulose; leaflets 5 or 7, rarely 3, elliptic, simply serrate, dull-green, sparingly puberulent above, densely-pubescent beneath, 1.5-4 cm. long; flowers solitary or few together; pedicels 2-3 cm. long, glabrous; hypanthium globose, glabrous, in fruit 12-15 mm. thick, scarlet; petals dark rose-colored, 2-2.5 cm. long, obcordate; sepals lanceolate, attenuate, 2 cm. long, glabrous on the back, tomentose on the margins, in fruit erect and persistent; styles distinct, persistent, not exserted; achenes inserted both in the bottom and on the sides of the hypanthium.
Type locality: Europe.
Distribution: Europe and northern Asia; cultivated and occasionally escaped in the eastern states and Wisconsin.
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1918. ROSACEAE (conclusio). North American flora. vol 22(6). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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Rosa pimpinellifolia

provided by wikipedia EN

Rosa pimpinellifolia, the burnet rose, is a species of rose native to western, central and southern Europe (north to Iceland and Norway) and northwest Africa.

Habitat

It is generally restricted to sand dunes or limestone pavements and typically has a coastal distribution when not on limestone.

Description

It is a rather low erect deciduous plant usually from 20–140 cm high but sometimes up to 2 metres. It spreads by basal shoots and can cover large areas. The stems have very numerous stiff bristles and many straight prickles. The young stems and prickles and the mature leaves tend to be very red with young growth a bright scarlet and older growth a deep maroon.

The flowers are cream-white although rarely also pale pink. They are 2–4 cm diameter with five petals, which produce a distinctive globular dark purple to black hips.

Similar plants native further east in Asia, sometimes treated as Rosa pimpinellifolia var. subalpina, are now regarded as a separate species Rosa oxyacantha (Flora of China); it differs in having pink flowers and red hips.

Cultivation

Numerous varieties are cultivated, of which "Stanwell Perpetual" has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[1] It has very pale pink double flowers, fading to white.

In emblematic terms it is particularly associated with Scotland, where it is traditionally referenced in poetry and song, and is a symbolic native plant second only to the thistle.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Rosa Stanwell Perpetual". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 29 Apr 2017.
  2. ^ Team, National Records of Scotland Web (31 May 2013). "National Records of Scotland". www.nrscotland.gov.uk.
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Rosa pimpinellifolia: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Rosa pimpinellifolia, the burnet rose, is a species of rose native to western, central and southern Europe (north to Iceland and Norway) and northwest Africa.

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