dcsimg

Nautilida

provided by wikipedia EN

The Nautilida constitute a large and diverse order of generally coiled nautiloid cephalopods that began in the mid Paleozoic and continues to the present with a single family, the Nautilidae which includes two genera, Nautilus and Allonautilus, with six species. All told, between 22 and 34 families and 165 to 184 genera have been recognised, making this the largest order of the subclass Nautiloidea.

Classification and phylogeny

Current classification

The current classification of the Nautilida, in prevalent use,[1] is that of Bernhard Kummel (Kummel 1964) in the Treatise which divides the Nautilida into five superfamilies, the Aipocerataceae, Clydonautilaceae, Tainocerataceae, and Trigonocerataceae, mostly of the Paleozoic, and the later Nautilaceae. These include 22 families and some 165 or so genera (Teichert and Moore 1964)

Other concepts

Shimansky 1962 (in Kummel 1964) divided the Nautilida into five suborders, the mostly Paleozoic Centroceratina, Liroceratina, Rutoceratina, and Tainoceratina, and the Mesozoic to recent Nautilina. These include superfamilies which are different from those of Kummel (1964) and of less extent. The Centroceratina are comparable to the Trigonocerataceae, the Liroceratina to the Clydonautilaceae, and the Nautilina to the Nautilaceae. The main difference is that the Rutoceratidae are included with the Aipocerataceae of Kummel (1964) in the Rutoceratina. The remaining Tainocerataceae are the Tainoceratina.

Rousseau Flower (1950) distinguished the Solenochilida, Rutoceratida, and Centroceratida, as separate orders, from the Nautilida, derived from the Barrandeocerida, which are now abandoned. Within the Nautilida, he placed 10 families, included in the Nautilaceae and the no longer considered ancestral Clydonautilaceae. Teichert's 1988 classification is an abridged version of Shimansky's and Flower's early schemes.

Derivation and evolution

Both Shimansky and Kummel derive the Nautilida from the Oncocerida with either the Acleistoceratidae or Brevicoceratidae (Teichert 1988) which share some similarities with the Rutoceratidae as the source. The Rutoceratidae are the ancestral family of the Tainocerataceae and of the Nautilida (Kummel 1964) and of Shimansky's and Teichert's Rutoceratina.

The Tainocerataceae gave rise, probably through the ancestral Rutoceratidae, to the Trigonocerataceae and Clydonautiliaceae in the Devonian and to the Aipocerataceae early in the Carboniferous. The Trigonocerataceae, in turn, gave rise late in the Triassic through the Syringonautilidae to the Nautilaceae, which include the Nautilidae, with Nautilus. (Kummel 1964)

Diversity and evolutionary history

The Nautilida are thought to be derived from either of the oncocerid families, Acleistoceratidae or Brevicoceratidae (Kummel 1964; Teichert 1988), both of which have the same sort of shells and internal structure as found in the Devonian Rutocerina of Shimanskiy, the earliest true nautilids. Flower (1950) suggested the Nautilida evolved from the Barrandeocerida, an idea he came later to reject in favor of derivation from the Oncocerida. The idea that the Nautilida evolved from straight-shelled ("Orthoceras") nautiloids, as proposed by Otto Schindewolf in 1942, through transitional forms such as the Ordovician Lituites can be rejected out of hand as evolutionarily unlikely. Lituites and the Lituitidae are derived tarphycerids and belong to a separate evolutionary branch of nautilioids.

The number of nautilid genera increased from the Early Devonian to about 22 in the Middle Devonian. During this time, their shells were more varied than those found in species of living Nautilus, ranging from curved (cyrtoconic), through loosely coiled (gyroconic), to tightly coiled forms, represented by the Rutoceratidae, Tetragonoceratidae, and Centroceratidae.

Nautilids declined in the Late Devonian, but again diversified in the Carboniferous, when some 75 genera and subgenera in some 16 families are known to have lived. Although there was considerable diversity in form, curved and loosely coiled shells are rare or absent, except in the superfamily Aipocerataceae. For the rest, nautilids adapted the standard planispiral shell form, although not all were as tightly coiled as the modern nautilids (Teichert 1988). There was, however, a great diversity in surface ornamentation, cross section, and so on, with some genera, such as the Permian Cooperoceras and Acanthonautilus, developing large lateral spikes (Fenton and Fenton 1958).

Despite again decreasing in diversity in the Permian, nautilids were less affected by the Permian-Triassic extinction than their distant relatives the Ammonoidea. During the Late Triassic there was a tendency in the Clydonautilaceae to develop sutures similar to those of some Late Devonian goniatites. Only a single genus, Cenoceras, with a shell similar to that of the modern nautilus, survived the less severe Triassic extinction, at which time the entire Nautiloidea almost became extinct.

For the remainder of the Mesozoic, nautilids once again flourished, although never at the level of their Paleozoic glory, and 24 genera are known from the Cretaceous. Again, the nautilids were not as affected by the end Cretaceous mass extinction as the Ammonoids that became entirely extinct, possibly because their larger eggs were better suited to survive the conditions of that environment-changing event.

Three families and at least five genera of nautilids are known to have survived this crisis in the history of life. There was a further resurgence during the Paleocene and Eocene, with several new genera, the majority of which had a worldwide distribution. During the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary, the Hercoglossidae and Aturiidae again developed sutures like those of Devonian goniatites. (Teichert 1988, pp. 43–44)

Miocene nautilids were still fairly widespread, but today the order includes only two genera, Nautilus and Allonautilus, limited to the southwest Pacific.

References

  • Fenton and Fenton (1958), The Fossil Book (Doubleday & Co., Garden City, New York).
  • Kümmel, B. (1964) "Nautilida" in Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part K. Mollusca 3. (Geological Society of America, and University of Kansas Press).
  • Moore, Lalicker and Fischer, (1952) Invertebrate Fossils, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, Toronto, London.
  • Teichert, T. (1988) "Main Features of Cephalopod Evolution", in The Mollusca vol. 12, Paleontology and Neontology of Cephalopods, ed. by M.R. Clarke & E.R. Trueman, Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Nautilida: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Nautilida constitute a large and diverse order of generally coiled nautiloid cephalopods that began in the mid Paleozoic and continues to the present with a single family, the Nautilidae which includes two genera, Nautilus and Allonautilus, with six species. All told, between 22 and 34 families and 165 to 184 genera have been recognised, making this the largest order of the subclass Nautiloidea.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Nautilida ( Spanish; Castilian )

provided by wikipedia ES

Los nautílidos (Nautilida) es un orden de moluscos cefalópodos, en su mayoría extintos, que incluye al nautilos moderno, sus antecesores inmediatos y sus parientes más cercanos. Se supone que evolucionaron a partir de miembros del orden Oncocerida. Fue un grupo amplio y diverso desde finales del Paleozoico hasta mediados del Cenozoico. Se estima que hay alrededor de 30 familias, siendo el orden más amplio de los Nautiloidea.

Se caracterizan por tener el mismo tipo de concha y la misma estructura interna que los nautilos actuales. Solo han sobrevivido seis especies hasta la actualidad, repartidas entre los géneros Nautilus y Allonautilus.

Referencias

  • Bouchet, P., ed. (2015). «Nautilida». World Register of Marine Species (en inglés). Consultado el 27 de agosto de 2015.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autores y editores de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia ES

Nautilida: Brief Summary ( Spanish; Castilian )

provided by wikipedia ES

Los nautílidos (Nautilida) es un orden de moluscos cefalópodos, en su mayoría extintos, que incluye al nautilos moderno, sus antecesores inmediatos y sus parientes más cercanos. Se supone que evolucionaron a partir de miembros del orden Oncocerida. Fue un grupo amplio y diverso desde finales del Paleozoico hasta mediados del Cenozoico. Se estima que hay alrededor de 30 familias, siendo el orden más amplio de los Nautiloidea.

Se caracterizan por tener el mismo tipo de concha y la misma estructura interna que los nautilos actuales. Solo han sobrevivido seis especies hasta la actualidad, repartidas entre los géneros Nautilus y Allonautilus.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autores y editores de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia ES

Nautilida ( French )

provided by wikipedia FR

Les nautiles (Nautilida) constituent un ordre de mollusques céphalopodes.

Espèces actuelles

On ne connaît actuellement plus qu'une seule famille de nautiles, avec deux genres totalisant 8 espèces, demeurés assez proches morphologiquement de leurs ancêtres du Paléozoïque.

Selon World Register of Marine Species (7 avril 2014)[1] :

Évolution du groupe

Ce groupe a connu un grand succès évolutif au Paléozoïque et au Mésozoïque, avec des milliers d'espèces recensées, dont certaines espèces fossiles non enroulées (orthocônes) de la famille des Endoceratidae pouvaient atteindre 6 mètres de long[Note 1].

Ainsi, au sein de la super-famille des Nautiloidea, en plus de la famille survivante des Nautilidae Blainville, 1825, certaines classifications recensent :

Selon BioLib (27 janvier 2018)[4] :

Selon Paleobiology Database (22 novembre 2016)[5] :

 src=
À gauche, un Nautiloidea à coquille droite reconstitué dans un diorama de la période Silurienne.

Dans la coquille des Nautiloidea, le siphon qui relie les logettes est en position axiale alors qu'il est apical, le long de la paroi, chez les ammonites, tous fossiles.

Références taxinomiques

Notes et références

Notes

  1. C'est en particulier le cas du genre Cameroceras de l'Ordovicien initialement estimé, à partir de fragments de la coquille de l'animal, à 9 mètres de long[2]. Sa longueur a été ensuite révisée à environ 6 mètres[3].

Références

  1. World Register of Marine Species, consulté le 7 avril 2014
  2. (en) Teichert C. & B. Kummel, « Size of Endocerid Cephalopods », Breviora Mus. Comp. Zool., vol. 128,‎ 1960, p. 1–7
  3. (en) Frey, R.C. 1995. « Middle and Upper Ordovician nautiloid cephalopods of the Cincinnati Arch region of Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio. » U.S. Geological Survey, p.73
  4. BioLib, consulté le 27 janvier 2018
  5. Fossilworks Paleobiology Database, consulté le 22 novembre 2016
  6. Tintant H. & Kabamba M. (1983) – Le Nautile, fossile vivant ou forme cryptogène ? Essai sur l’évolution et la classification des Nautilacés. Bulletin de la Société Zoologique de France, Paris, vol. 108, 4, p. 569-579
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Auteurs et éditeurs de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Nautilida: Brief Summary ( French )

provided by wikipedia FR

Les nautiles (Nautilida) constituent un ordre de mollusques céphalopodes.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Auteurs et éditeurs de Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Nautilida ( Italian )

provided by wikipedia IT

I Nautilida Agassiz, 1847 sono un ordine di molluschi cefalopodi, prevalentemente estinti, che include tutti i nautilus attuali e le loro forme ancestrali.

Tutti i nautiloidi recenti e attuali sono inclusi in questo gruppo, che, originatosi nel Paleozoico superiore (Devoniano), è stato rappresentato nella sua lunga storia evolutiva da 24-34 famiglie e da 165-184 generi riconosciuti (la tassonomia del gruppo, come quella di tutti i nautiloidi è piuttosto complessa e controversa).

Attualmente, questo gruppo è rappresentato da una sola famiglia (Nautilidae) e dai due generi: Nautilus e Allonautilus.

Storia evolutiva

I Nautilida compaiono nel Devoniano Inferiore con poche forme piuttosto rare, e si espandono rapidamente nel Devoniano Medio. I Nautilida del Devoniano comprendono forme sia planispirali, simili alle attuali, sia cirtocone (debolmente ricurve) e girocone (a spirale “lenta”, con giri non a contatto tra loro).

La maggior parte dei ricercatori individua le forme ancestrali dei Nautilida in generi con avvolgimento cirtocono o girocono, sifone da ventrale a sub-centrale e privi di depositi endosifonali e camerali, per la maggior parte con colletti settali ortocoanitici e anelli connettivi tubulari o debolmente inflati. Questa tipologia di caratteri è riscontrabile in diversi generi vissuti dal Siluriano al Devoniano Inferiore, riferiti agli ordini Tarphycerida e Barrandeocerida (gruppi con caratteri in parte sovrapposti, la cui sistematica è tuttora piuttosto fluttuante), e all'ordine Oncocerida. La posizione tassonomica di queste forme è in realtà ancora incerta, e tutt'altro che univoca nella letteratura scientifica, anche per la frammentarietà e la rarità dei ritrovamenti (soprattutto nel Devoniano). Un'ampia corrente di ricerca, (Teichert, 1988), identifica le forme ancestrali dei Nautilida devoniani direttamente in alcune forme di Oncocerida tardo-ordoviciane e siluriane. Un'altra, che fa capo soprattutto alle scuole l'Europa dell'est (ex Cecoslovacchia, Polonia, Russia), e ha preso nuovo vigore in anni recenti da ritrovamenti eccezionalmente conservati (Turek, 2008, con bibliografia) indica una derivazione dei Nautilida da forme del Siluriano appartenenti agli ordini Tarphycerida/Barrandeocerida.

 src=
Esemplare di Cymatoceras sp. , una forma caratterizzata da setti molto semplici, dall'Albiano del Madagascar. L'esemplare è un fragmocono: sull'ultimo setto è visibile il foro del sifone, in posizione marginale (sub-ventrale).

In particolare, è stata notata a varie riprese la stretta convergenza morfologico-strutturale di alcune forme planispirali esogastriche siluriane appartenenti a questi due ordini con nautiloidi tipici, anche attuali (soprattutto il genere Allonautilus, con caratteri primitivi). Questa derivazione si basa, oltre che sulla morfologia esterna, sulla struttura del sifone di queste forme, caratterizzato da colletti settali ortocoanitici e anelli di connessione debolmente inflati, composti da due strati:

  • strato esterno, a struttura sferulitico-prismatica;
  • strato interno, di natura organica, composto di glicoproteina (conchiolina).

Non mancano peraltro indicazioni a favore di una derivazione dagli Orthocerida, (Dzik, 1981), riferibili però sempre all'incertezza sistematica delle forme indicate (in questo caso gli Uranoceratidae, attribuiti tanto ai Tarphycerida quanto agli Orthocerida).

La crisi biologica tardo-devoniana (fatale per diversi gruppi di nautiloidi del Paleozoico Inferiore, compresi i probabili progenitori) causa un limitato declino di questo gruppo, che si espande successivamente nel Carbonifero e ancor più nel Permiano. In questo intervallo di tempo i Nautilida adottano definitivamente la morfologia standard planispirale, più o meno involuta, che manterranno per tutta la loro storia.

 src=
Esemplare di Hercoglossa sp.. Questa forma è caratterizzata da suture settali piuttosto complesse, marcatamente ondulate e angolose, dalCretaceo del Madagascar. L'esemplare è un modello interno con tracce di guscio con la camera di abitazione parzialmente conservata.

La nuova crisi al limite permo-triassico causa di nuovo una riduzione della diversità all'interno del gruppo, che riprende durante quasi tutto il Triassico. Nel Retico (Trias Superiore), una crisi biologica è fatale alla maggior parte delle forme dei Nautilida (oltre che a tutti i superstiti del più antico gruppo degli Orthocerida).

Solo un genere (Cenoceras) sopravvive nel Giurassico Inferiore. Nel Mesozoico i Nautilida rifioriscono fino a raggiungere una discreta differenziazione nel Cretaceo (24 generi conosciuti). Nel periodo che va dal tardo Giurassico a tutto il Cretaceo, alcune forme (famiglia Hercoglossidae), tendono a sviluppare suture più complesse, di tipo simile alle suture goniatitiche di ammonoidi del Paleozoico Superiore.

La crisi al limite Cretaceo-Terziario non ha grandi ripercussioni su questo gruppo, che si espande nuovamente nel Paleogene e nel Miocene con forme spesso a sutura complessa (Aturiidae) e cosmopolite, ad ampia diffusione. Nel Pliocene e nel Pleistocene, probabilmente per il raffreddamento generalizzato del clima, i Nautilida subiscono un nuovo declino fino agli attuali due soli generi Nautilus e Allonautilus (famiglia Nautilidae).

Bibliografia

  • Dzik, J. (1981). Origin of the Cephalopoda. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 26, 2, 161-191.
  • Teichert, T. (1988) Main Features of Cephalopod Evolution, in The Mollusca vol. 12, Paleontology and Neontology of Cephalopods. Ed. by M.R. Clarke & E.R. Trueman, Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  • Turek, V. 2008. Boionautilus gen. nov. from the Silurian of Europe and North Africa (Nautiloidea, Tarphycerida). Bulletin of Geosciences 83(2), 141–152 (7 figures). Czech Geological Survey, Prague. ISSN 1214-1119.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autori e redattori di Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia IT

Nautilida: Brief Summary ( Italian )

provided by wikipedia IT

I Nautilida Agassiz, 1847 sono un ordine di molluschi cefalopodi, prevalentemente estinti, che include tutti i nautilus attuali e le loro forme ancestrali.

Tutti i nautiloidi recenti e attuali sono inclusi in questo gruppo, che, originatosi nel Paleozoico superiore (Devoniano), è stato rappresentato nella sua lunga storia evolutiva da 24-34 famiglie e da 165-184 generi riconosciuti (la tassonomia del gruppo, come quella di tutti i nautiloidi è piuttosto complessa e controversa).

Attualmente, questo gruppo è rappresentato da una sola famiglia (Nautilidae) e dai due generi: Nautilus e Allonautilus.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Autori e redattori di Wikipedia
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia IT