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Strobilomyces
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Strobilomyces is a genus of boletes (mushrooms having a spongy mass of pores under the cap). The only well-known European species is the type species S. strobilaceus (also named S. floccopus), known in English as "old man of the woods".

Members of the genus can be distinguished by the following characteristics:

  • the cap and stipe are covered in soft hairy or woolly scales,
  • while most boletes have smooth elongated spores, those of Strobilomyces are roughly spherical and prominently ornamented, and
  • as might be expected from its "dry" fibrous appearance, it is resistant to decay (whereas most mushrooms in the Boletaceae are soft and decompose notoriously rapidly).

Taxonomy and classification

The genus name comes from the Ancient Greek word Strobilos (στρόβιλος), meaning "pine cone", a reference to the appearance of S. strobilaceus. The ending "-myces" is a standard suffix meaning "mushroom" (Ancient Greek: μύкης). In some older classification systems it is assigned to a separate family Strobilomycetaceae,[2] but more recent phylogenetic evidence merges it into the larger family Boletaceae (suborder Boletineae).[3] These results corroborate older DNA analyses by K. Høiland (1987), which suggested that Strobilomyces is only distantly related to more familiar boletes such as Suillus, but was in fact more closely related to the Earth Balls (Scleroderma).[4]

Many more species have been discovered in warmer countries. The mycologist E. J. H. Corner described several new species from Malaysia including S. foveatus.[5] According to recent estimates, about 40 species are known.[6]

List of species

References

  1. ^ "Strobilomyces Berk. 1851". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 2011-07-04..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ McNabb R.F.R. (1967) The Strobilomycataceae of New Zealand Archived 2005-05-30 at the Wayback Machine. gives a history of the family.
  3. ^ Binder M, Hibbett DS (2006). "Molecular systematics and biological diversification of Boletales". Mycologia. 98 (6): 971–81. doi:10.3852/mycologia.98.6.971. PMID 17486973.
  4. ^ Høiland K. (1987). "A new approach to the phylogeny of the order Boletales (Basidiomycotina)". Nordic Journal of Botany 7: 705–718. See this web page for more details.
  5. ^ *Corner EJH. (1972). Boletus in Malaysia. Government Printing Office/Botanic Gardens, Singapore.
  6. ^ a b Gelardi G, Vizzini A, Ercole E, Voyron S, Wu G, Liu XZ (2013). "Strobilomyces echinocephalus sp nov (Boletales) from south-western China, and a key to the genus Strobilomyces worldwide". Mycological Progress. 12 (3): 577–88. doi:10.1007/s11557-012-0865-3.
  7. ^ a b Chen Chien-Ming 1994 Novel and new records published by T.E.S.R.I Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine. (Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute)
  8. ^ Chiu WF. (1948). "The Boletes of Yunnan". Mycologia. 40 (2): 199–231 (see p.&nbsp, 229). doi:10.2307/3755085.
  9. ^ Sato H, Hattori T, Lee SS, Murakami N (2011). "Two species of Strobilomyces (Boletaceae, Boletales), S. seminudus and S. hongoi sp. nov. from Japan". Mycologia. 103 (2): 598–609. doi:10.3852/10-182. PMID 21177488. open access publication – free to read

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Strobilomyces: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN

Strobilomyces is a genus of boletes (mushrooms having a spongy mass of pores under the cap). The only well-known European species is the type species S. strobilaceus (also named S. floccopus), known in English as "old man of the woods".

Members of the genus can be distinguished by the following characteristics:

the cap and stipe are covered in soft hairy or woolly scales, while most boletes have smooth elongated spores, those of Strobilomyces are roughly spherical and prominently ornamented, and as might be expected from its "dry" fibrous appearance, it is resistant to decay (whereas most mushrooms in the Boletaceae are soft and decompose notoriously rapidly).
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN
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bdb81d5bf3001f71144af7ddcf1a6d1b