dcsimg

Rhodocybe

provided by wikipedia EN

Rhodocybe is a small genus of small and medium-sized brownish-pink spored mushrooms, or (following recent mycological research) it is a subgroup of genus Clitopilus. These mushrooms are saprotrophic and most grow on the ground, but some are found on wood. Most are drab in appearance, though a few have vivid colors.

Description

The cap shape can be convex, plane, or depressed. The gills usually have adnate to decurrent attachment, rarely notched and the stems of the mushrooms are highly variable, but always lack a veil or volva.

The spores are flesh-colored to salmon to brownish pink. Microscopically the shape of the spores is important in defining the group.

About 20 species of Rhodocybe have been documented in Europe, but R. gemina (sometimes wrongly named R. truncata) is the commonest and best known, though rare in Britain.[1] The type species is Rhodocybe caelata (Fr.) Maire.

Little is known about the edibility of Rhodocybes, but one prominent mushroom guide indicates that R. gemina (or Clitopilus geminus) is good to eat.[1]

Taxonomic status

The group belongs to family Entolomataceae (with pink spore print and angular spores) and the members are similar to some Entoloma or Clitopilus species, being distinguished by spore shape; essentially Entoloma spores are polyhedral (angular in all views), Clitopilus spores have longitudinal ridges, and Rhodocybes spores are angular when viewed on end but bumpy to weakly angular when viewed from the side. But in 2009, CoDavid et al. found that Clitopilus species form a clade nested within the Rhodocybe species and proposed that these genera should be merged so that the new genus would be monophyletic. Since the name Clitopilus is older, it takes precedence and the name Rhodocybe should be dropped.[2]

Rhodocybe is divided into four subsections - Rhodocybe, Rhodophana (now considered a separate genus according to Species Fungorum and a paper of 2013),[3] Decurrentes, and Rufobrunneua.

References

  1. ^ a b Marcel Bon (1987). The Mushrooms and Toadstools of Britain and North-western Europe. 7 Bond Street, St. Helier, Jersey: Domino Books Ltd. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-340-39935-4.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link) Here the name is given as Rhodocybe truncata, but in a later edition of this book the name is corrected to R. gemina and the author mentions that this is a good edible species: Marcel Bon (2004). Champignons de France et d'Europe occidental (in French). Flammarion. p. 188. ISBN 978-2-0820-1321-5.
  2. ^ D. Co-David; D. Langeveld; M.E. Noordeloos (Nov 2009). "Molecular phylogeny and spore evolution of Entolomataceae" (PDF). Persoonia. 23 (2): 147–176. doi:10.3767/003158509x480944. PMC 2802732. PMID 20198166. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-27.
  3. ^ K.L. Kluting; T.J. Baroni; S.E. Bergemann (2013). "Toward a stable classification of genera within the Entolomataceae: a phylogenetic re-evaluation of the Rhodocybe-Clitopilus clade". Mycologia. 106 (6): 1127–1142. doi:10.3852/13-270. PMID 24987124.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Rhodocybe: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Rhodocybe is a small genus of small and medium-sized brownish-pink spored mushrooms, or (following recent mycological research) it is a subgroup of genus Clitopilus. These mushrooms are saprotrophic and most grow on the ground, but some are found on wood. Most are drab in appearance, though a few have vivid colors.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN