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Boletus

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Boletus is a genus of mushroom-producing fungi, comprising over 100 species. The genus Boletus was originally broadly defined and described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, essentially containing all fungi with hymenial pores instead of gills. Since then, other genera have been defined gradually, such as Tylopilus by Petter Adolf Karsten in 1881, and old names such as Leccinum have been resurrected or redefined. Some mushrooms listed in older books as members of the genus have now been placed in separate genera. These include such as Boletus scaber, now Leccinum scabrum, Tylopilus felleus, Chalciporus piperatus and Suillus luteus. More recently, Boletus has been found to be massively polyphyletic, with only a small percentage of the over 300 species that have been assigned to Boletus actually belonging there and necessitating the description and resurrection of many more genera.[2][3][4][5]

The name is derived from the Latin term bōlētus 'mushroom' from the Ancient Greek βωλίτης, bōlitēs,[6] ultimately from βῶλος, bōlos 'lump' or 'clod'.[7] However, the βωλίτης, of Galen is thought to have been the much prized Amanita caesarea.[8]

Edibility

The genus Boletus contains many members which are edible, such as Boletus edulis, Boletus aereus and Boletus barrowsii.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Boletus L." Species Fungorum. CAB International. Retrieved 2014-02-04.
  2. ^ a b Nuhn ME, Binder M, Taylor AF, Halling RE, Hibbett DS (2013). "Phylogenetic overview of the Boletineae". Fungal Biology. 117 (7–8): 479–511. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2013.04.008. PMID 23931115.
  3. ^ Binder M, Hibbett DS (2006). "Molecular systematics and biological diversification of Boletales". Mycologia. 98 (6): 971–81. doi:10.3852/mycologia.98.6.971. PMID 17486973.
  4. ^ Dentinger B, Ammirati J, Both EE, Desjardin D, Halling RE, Henkey TW, Moreau PA, Nagasawaa E, Soytong K, Taylor A, Watling R, Moncalvo J, McLaughlin D (2010). "Molecular phylogenetics of porcini mushrooms (Boletus section Boletus)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 57 (3): 1276–92. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2010.10.004. PMID 20970511.
  5. ^ Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Zhu, Xue-Tai; Li, Yan-Chun; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Hosen, Md. Iqbal; Yang, Zhu L. (2014). "Molecular phylogenetic analyses redefine seven major clades and reveal 22 new generic clades in the fungal family Boletaceae". Fungal Diversity. 69 (1): 93–115. doi:10.1007/s13225-014-0283-8.
  6. ^ Simpson, D.P. (1979). Cassell's Latin Dictionary (5 ed.). London: Cassell Ltd. p. 883. ISBN 0-304-52257-0.
  7. ^ Liddell, Henry George and Robert Scott (1980). A Greek-English Lexicon (Abridged ed.). United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-910207-4.
  8. ^ Ramsbottom J (1953). Mushrooms & Toadstools. Collins. p. 6. ISBN 1-870630-09-2.

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Boletus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Boletus is a genus of mushroom-producing fungi, comprising over 100 species. The genus Boletus was originally broadly defined and described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, essentially containing all fungi with hymenial pores instead of gills. Since then, other genera have been defined gradually, such as Tylopilus by Petter Adolf Karsten in 1881, and old names such as Leccinum have been resurrected or redefined. Some mushrooms listed in older books as members of the genus have now been placed in separate genera. These include such as Boletus scaber, now Leccinum scabrum, Tylopilus felleus, Chalciporus piperatus and Suillus luteus. More recently, Boletus has been found to be massively polyphyletic, with only a small percentage of the over 300 species that have been assigned to Boletus actually belonging there and necessitating the description and resurrection of many more genera.

The name is derived from the Latin term bōlētus 'mushroom' from the Ancient Greek βωλίτης, bōlitēs, ultimately from βῶλος, bōlos 'lump' or 'clod'. However, the βωλίτης, of Galen is thought to have been the much prized Amanita caesarea.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN