dcsimg

Heliocybe

provided by wikipedia EN

Heliocybe is an agaric genus[1] closely allied to Neolentinus and the bracket fungus, Gloeophyllum, all of which cause brown rot of wood.[2][3] Heliocybe sulcata, the type and sole species, is characterized by thumb-sized, tough, revivable, often dried, mushroom fruitbodies, with a tanned symmetric pileus that is radially cracked into a cartoon sun-like pattern of arranged scales and ridges, distant serrated lamellae, and a scaly central stipe. Microscopically it differs from Neolentinus by the absence of clamp connections. Like Neolentinus, it produces abundant, conspicuous pleurocystidia. Heliocybe sulcata typically fruits on decorticated, sun-dried and cracked wood, such as fence posts and rails, vineyard trellises in Europe, branches in slash areas, and semi-arid areas such on sagebrush or on naio branches in rain shadow areas of Hawaii, or in open pine forests.[4][5][6][7]

Etymology

Heliocybe derives from the Greek helios (= the sun) and cybe (=head), and means "the sun-head". It was coined in reference to its sun-like pattern on its pileus together with its affinity to sun-baked habitats.

Classification

In older classifications, H. sulcata[1] was known as Lentinus sulcatus or Panus fulvidus. However, there is strong phylogenetic evidence for the segregation of a group of brown rot causing fungi at the level of order, including Neolentinus and Heliocybe and Gloeophyllum, from the Polyporales where Lentinus and Panus are classified.[2][3][8][9][10] Heliocybe has also been placed into synonymy with Neolentinus, but anatomically they differ by the absence versus the presence of clamp connections[1] and phylogenetically Heliocybe is distinct, being either a sister group to Neolentinus or to a Neolentinus-Gloeophyllum-clade, or allied to Gloeophyllum odoratum.[2][3][9][10]

References

  1. ^ a b Redhead, S.A.; Ginns, J.H. (1985). "A reappraisal of agaric genera associated with brown rots of wood". Trans. Mycol. Soc. Japan. 26: 349–381.
  2. ^ a b c Thorn, R.G.; et al. (2000). "Phylogenetic analyses and the distribution of nematophagy support monophyletic Pleurotaceae within the polyphyletic pleurotoid-lentinoid fungi". Mycologia. Mycologia, Vol. 92, No. 2. 92 (2): 241–252. doi:10.2307/3761557. JSTOR 3761557.
  3. ^ a b c Hibbett, D.S.; Donoghue, M.J. (2001). "Analysis of character correlations among wood decay mechanisms, mating systems, and substrate ranges in Homobasidiomycetes". Syst. Biol. 50 (2): 215–242. doi:10.1080/10635150151125879. PMID 12116929.
  4. ^ Redhead, S.A. (1989). "A biogeographical overview of the Canadian mushroom flora". Can. J. Bot. 67 (10): 3003–3062. doi:10.1139/b89-384.
  5. ^ Schalkwijk-Barendsen, H.M.E. (1991). "Mushrooms of western Canada". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  6. ^ Evenson, V.S. (1997). "Mushrooms of Colorado and the southern Rocky Mountains". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  7. ^ Hemmes, D.E.; Desjardin, D.E. (2002). "An identification guide – mushrooms of Hawai'i". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. ^ Hibbett, D.S.; Binder, M. (2002). "Evolution of complex fruiting-body morphologies in homobasidiomycetes". Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B. 269 (1504): 1963–1969. doi:10.1098/rspb.2002.2123. PMC 1691125. PMID 12396494.
  9. ^ a b Binder, M.; et al. (2005). "The phylogenetic distribution of resupinate forms across the major clades of mushroom-forming fungi (Homobasidiomycetes)". Syst. Biodivers. 3 (2): 113–157. doi:10.1017/S1477200005001623.
  10. ^ a b García-Sandoval R; Wang Z; Binder M; Hibbett DS. (2011). "Molecular phylogenetics of the Gloeophyllales and relative ages of clades of Agaricomycotina producing a brown rot". Mycologia. 103 (3): 510–524. doi:10.3852/10-209. PMID 21186327.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Heliocybe: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Heliocybe is an agaric genus closely allied to Neolentinus and the bracket fungus, Gloeophyllum, all of which cause brown rot of wood. Heliocybe sulcata, the type and sole species, is characterized by thumb-sized, tough, revivable, often dried, mushroom fruitbodies, with a tanned symmetric pileus that is radially cracked into a cartoon sun-like pattern of arranged scales and ridges, distant serrated lamellae, and a scaly central stipe. Microscopically it differs from Neolentinus by the absence of clamp connections. Like Neolentinus, it produces abundant, conspicuous pleurocystidia. Heliocybe sulcata typically fruits on decorticated, sun-dried and cracked wood, such as fence posts and rails, vineyard trellises in Europe, branches in slash areas, and semi-arid areas such on sagebrush or on naio branches in rain shadow areas of Hawaii, or in open pine forests.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN