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Brief Summary

    Geosmithia: Brief Summary
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    Geosmithia is a genus of anamorphic fungi of uncertain familial placement in the order Hypocreales. The genus, circumscribed by Australian mycologist John Pitt in 1979, is widely distributed. A 2008 estimate placed ten species in the genus, but several new species have since been described. Thousand cankers disease, which affects economically important black walnut (Juglans nigra) populations in North America, is caused by Geosmithia morbida.

    Species in the genus are generally similar to those in Penicillium, but can be distinguished from them by forming cylindrical conidia from rough-walled phialides. Additionally, the conidia of Geosmithia do not have a green color, in contrast to the characteristic blue-grey or green-grey conidia of Penicillium. Some Geosmithia species have teleomorphic forms that are classified in the genus Talaromyces. However, Geosmithia is a polyphyletic taxon with evolutionary affinities to at least three groups of the euascomycete lineage within the Ascomycota. The generic name Geosmithia honors British mycologist George Smith.

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Comprehensive Description

    Geosmithia
    provided by wikipedia

    Geosmithia is a genus of anamorphic fungi of uncertain familial placement in the order Hypocreales. The genus, circumscribed by Australian mycologist John Pitt in 1979,[1] is widely distributed. A 2008 estimate placed ten species in the genus,[2] but several new species have since been described. Thousand cankers disease, which affects economically important black walnut (Juglans nigra) populations in North America, is caused by Geosmithia morbida.[3]

    Species in the genus are generally similar to those in Penicillium, but can be distinguished from them by forming cylindrical conidia from rough-walled phialides. Additionally, the conidia of Geosmithia do not have a green color, in contrast to the characteristic blue-grey or green-grey conidia of Penicillium. Some Geosmithia species have teleomorphic forms that are classified in the genus Talaromyces. However, Geosmithia is a polyphyletic taxon with evolutionary affinities to at least three groups of the euascomycete lineage within the Ascomycota.[4] The generic name Geosmithia honors British mycologist George Smith.[1]

    Species

    References

    1. ^ a b Pitt JI. (1979). "Geosmithia, gen. nov. for Penicillium lavendulum and related species". Canadian Journal of Botany. 57 (19): 2021–30. doi:10.1139/b79-252..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Kirk PM, Cannon PF, Minter DW, Stalpers JA (2008). Dictionary of the Fungi (10th ed.). Wallingford, UK: CAB International. p. 281. ISBN 978-0-85199-826-8.
    3. ^ Derickx L, Antunes PM (2013). A Guide to the Identification and Control of Exotic Invasive Species in Ontario's Hardwood Forests. Algoma University. pp. 259–60. ISBN 978-0-929100-21-0.
    4. ^ Ogawa H, Yoshimura A, Sugiyama J (1997). "Polyphyletic Origins of Species of the Anamorphic Genus Geosmithia and the Relationships of the Cleistothecial Genera: Evidence from 18S, 5S and 28S rDNA Sequence Analyses". Mycologia. 89 (5): 756–71. doi:10.2307/3761132. JSTOR 3761132.
    5. ^ Yaguchi T, Someya A, Udagawa S (1994). "Two new species of Talaromyces from Taiwan and Japan". Mycoscience. 35 (3): 249–55. doi:10.1007/BF02268446.
    6. ^ a b Kolarík M, Kirkendall LR (2010). "Evidence for a new lineage of primary ambrosia fungi in Geosmithia Pitt (Ascomycota: Hypocreales)". Fungal Biology. 114 (8): 676–89. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2010.06.005. PMID 20943178.
    7. ^ a b c Kolarík M, Kubátova A, Cepicka I, Pazoutovtá S, Srůtka P (2005). "A complex of three new white-spored, sympatric, and host range limited Geosmithia species". Mycological Research. 109 (12): 1323–36. doi:10.1017/S0953756205003965. PMID 16353633.
    8. ^ Yaguchi T, Miyadoh S, Udagawa SI (1993). "Chromocleista, a new cleistothecial genus with a Geosmithia anamorph". Transactions of the Mycological Society of Japan. 102: 101–8.
    9. ^ Wu Y-M, Xu J-J, Wang H-F, Zhang T-Y (2013). "Geosmithia tibetensis sp. nov. and new Gibellulopsis and Scopulariopsis records from Qinghai-Tibet". Mycotaxon. 125: 59–64. doi:10.5248/125.59.

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