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Argia
provided by wikipedia EN
For other uses, see Argia (disambiguation).

Argia is a genus of damselflies of the family Coenagrionidae and of the subfamily Argiinae. It is a diverse genus which contains about 114 species and many more to be described. It is also the largest genus in Argiinae. They are found in the Western Hemisphere. They are commonly known as dancers. Although the genus name comes from Ancient Greek: ἀργία, translit. argia, lit. 'laziness',[1] dancers are quite active and alert damselflies. The bluer Argia species may be confused with Enallagma species.

Characteristics

This genus of damselflies are known as dancers because of the distinctive jerky form of flight they use which contrasts with the straightforward direct flight of bluets, forktails and other pond damselflies. They are usually to be seen in the open where they catch flying insects on the wing rather than flying about among vegetation picking off sedentary prey items. They tend to land and perch flat on the ground, logs and rocks.[2] When perched, they usually hold their wing slightly raised above the abdomen.[3]

The males of most species are some combination of black and blue but they can easily be told from similarly coloured bluets by their mode of flight. Some species have red eyes and others a copper-coloured thorax. Many species have humeral stripes, either notched or forked at the end or narrowed in the centre. The wings have short petioles and are relatively broad close to the base.[2] Unlike most of the Coenagrionidae, dancers are often associated with flowing water.[3]

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Argia vivida

Species

The genus includes the following species:

Notes

  1. ^ "Greek Dictionary Headword Search Results". Perseus Project. Retrieved 25 October 2010..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b Paulson, Dennis (2009). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the West. Princeton University Press. pp. 140–141. ISBN 1-4008-3294-2.
  3. ^ a b Eaton, Kaufman & Bowers (2007). Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. HMH. ISBN 0-618-15310-1.
  4. ^ von Ellenrieder, N. (2009). "Argia huanacina". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009: e.T159102A5313103. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2009-2.RLTS.T159102A5313103.en. Retrieved 24 December 2017.
  5. ^ Paulson, D. R. (2009). "Argia westfalli". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2009: e.T164974A5949503. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2009-2.RLTS.T164974A5949503.en. Retrieved 24 December 2017.

References

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Argia: Brief Summary
provided by wikipedia EN
For other uses, see Argia (disambiguation).

Argia is a genus of damselflies of the family Coenagrionidae and of the subfamily Argiinae. It is a diverse genus which contains about 114 species and many more to be described. It is also the largest genus in Argiinae. They are found in the Western Hemisphere. They are commonly known as dancers. Although the genus name comes from Ancient Greek: ἀργία, translit. argia, lit. 'laziness', dancers are quite active and alert damselflies. The bluer Argia species may be confused with Enallagma species.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN
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