dcsimg

Comprehensive Description

    General Description
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    "The upperside wing pattern, with bold red bands and white apical spots on a black background, is unique and unlike any other Alberta species. The North American populations are slightly different in appearance from the European ones, and are generally referred to as subspecies rubria. The common name is somewhat misleading, since this is not an Admiral (genus Limentitis) at all; for this reason, some authors have reverted to an older name, the Red Admirable (Pyle 2002)."
    Habitat
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Widespread throughout most of the province, found especially near wooded areas.
    Trophic Strategy
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The larvae feed on nettles (Urtica spp.) (Scott 1986), and can be found on stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) in Alberta. Adults are attracted to rotting fruit and dung, but also flower nectar (Bird et al. 1995, Guppy & Shepard 2001).

Distribution

    Distribution
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Widespread throughout the northern hemisphere, occuring from northern Africa across most of Eurasia, and south to Guatemala in the New World; occasionally straying as far north as Iceland (Scott 1986).

Cyclicity

    Cyclicity
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Occurs throughout the season, most common in June and again in August.

Life Cycle

    Life Cycle
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    The light-green eggs are barrel-shaped and have nine vertical ribs. The mature larva are variable in colour, ranging from cream to grey, brown or black with fine white spots and a lateral stripe of greenish-yellow patches (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Larvae bear bear long branching spines that are generally black (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Larvae form a tent-like feeding shelter by tying together the edges of the leaf on which they are feeding (Guppy & Shepard 2001). It is unclear whether or not the Red Admiral survives the Alberta winter; the summer broods (mid-June onwards) are apparently the offspring of spring migrants. Remarkably, the Red Admiral is able to complete at least two broods in southern Canada after the arrival of spring migrants (Guppy & Shepard 2001, Layberry et al. 1998), with peak emergences in mid to late June and again in August.

Conservation Status

    Conservation Status
    provided by University of Alberta Museums
    Not of concern.