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Brief Summary

    Arenophryne: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Arenophryne is a small genus of Myobatrachid frogs from coastal Western Australia. Common names sandhill frogs and Australian dumpy frogs have been coined for it.

    Both species live in sand dune habitat of the Shark Bay region of Western Australia. The two species were initially considered to be just one species, but a genetic analysis found the northern and southern populations to be distinct. Breeding occurs during the wetter winter months where adults call near the surface, and mate underground. The eggs are laid in an underground burrow and develop directly from eggs to frogs.

    Genus overview
    provided by EOL authors

    Sandhill frogs are smallish fossorial anurans, known by two species, the Northern Sandhill Frog (Arenophryne rotunda) and the Southern Sandhill Frog (Arenophryne xiphorhyncha). Considerably more information is extant regarding the Northern Sandhill Frog. Both species are confined to very restricted spatial regimes in the near coastal area of Western Australia within the Southwest Australian savanna ecoregion.

    the Southern Sandhill frog, Arenophryne xiphorhyncha, was earlier thought to be identical to A. rotunda; however, more detailed analysis reveals this closely related species residing in the Kalbarri dunes, is a distinct taxon. These two taxa apparently genetically diverged approximately five to seven million years before present.

    The genus is known for its burrowing in soft sand soils in order to achieve hydradtion from the moist subsoil and to create burrows for refuge and breeding.

Comprehensive Description

    Arenophryne
    provided by wikipedia

    Arenophryne is a small genus of Myobatrachid frogs from coastal Western Australia. Common names sandhill frogs and Australian dumpy frogs have been coined for it.[1]

    Both species live in sand dune habitat of the Shark Bay region of Western Australia. The two species were initially considered to be just one species, but a genetic analysis found the northern and southern populations to be distinct.[2] Breeding occurs during the wetter winter months where adults call near the surface, and mate underground. The eggs are laid in an underground burrow and develop directly from eggs to frogs.

    Species

    There are two species:[1][3]

    Common name Binomial name Northern sandhill frog, sandhill frog, Australian dumpy frog Arenophryne rotunda Tyler, 1976 Southern sandhill frog Arenophryne xiphorhyncha Doughty and Edwards, 2008

    References

    1. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2017). "Arenophryne Tyler, 1976". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 24 September 2017..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Doughty, P.; Edwards, D. (2008). "A new species of sandhill frog (Myobatrachidae: Arenophryne) from the western coast of Australia". Records of the Western Australian Museum. 24: 121–131.
    3. ^ "Myobatrachidae". AmphibiaWeb. University of California, Berkeley. 2017. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
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