Family description

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From "Polychaetes: An interactive identification guide"

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Aeolosomatidae

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The Aeolosomatidae is a family of very small, aquatic annelid worms, between 0.3-10 mm in length and 0.04-0.06 mm in diameter. About 30 species have been described in three genera.[2] These worms are known as suction-feeding worms and occupy freshwater, brackish, and saltwater habitats. They are bottom and sediment dwellers, inhabiting spaces around aquatic plants and the detritus-rich sands and sediments of freshwater habitats (microfauna)[3]

Ecology

Aeolosomatids feed on microalgae, microorganisms, and detritus.[3] They place their prostomia over the substrate and create a vacuum, swallowing small particles and their attached algae. They are able to reproduce sexually, but most reproduction is asexual. This is done by paratomy/fission (fragmentation) as posterior segments break away or detach from the parent worm. This begins when the worm reaches a determined number of millimeters (depending on the species), which gives rise to the clonal production of a chain of filial zooids that detach themselves from the parental zooid in a few days.[2]

References

  1. ^ WoRMS (2015). "Aeolosomatidae Beddard, 1895". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Family Aeolosomatidae". Key to Australian Freshwater and Terrestrial Invertebrates. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Aeolosomatidae data - Encyclopedia of Life". eol.org. Retrieved 2021-03-08.
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Aeolosomatidae: Brief Summary

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The Aeolosomatidae is a family of very small, aquatic annelid worms, between 0.3-10 mm in length and 0.04-0.06 mm in diameter. About 30 species have been described in three genera. These worms are known as suction-feeding worms and occupy freshwater, brackish, and saltwater habitats. They are bottom and sediment dwellers, inhabiting spaces around aquatic plants and the detritus-rich sands and sediments of freshwater habitats (microfauna)

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