dcsimg

Brief Summary

    Idiomysis: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia
     src= Idiomysis in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia.  src= Idiomysis usually have a curled up abdomen.

    Idiomysis is a genus of small mysids found in warm, shallow waters of Indian Ocean (including Red Sea) and Pacific.

    license
    cc-by-sa-3.0
    copyright
    Wikipedia authors and editors
    original
    visit source
    partner site
    wikipedia
    ID
    70eb7a2734aedc506ebf260203fff849

Comprehensive Description

    Idiomysis
    provided by wikipedia
     src=
    Idiomysis in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia.
     src=
    Idiomysis usually have a curled up abdomen.

    Idiomysis is a genus of small mysids found in warm, shallow waters of Indian Ocean (including Red Sea) and Pacific.[2]

    Anatomy

    Mysids from the genus Idiomysis are just few millimeters length; their cephalothorax is gibbous and robust whereas the abdomen is characteristically curled up behind[1].[3] When compared with other mysids, Idiomysis has short antennae, relatively big eyes and small, usually unarmed telson[1], however a single species, I. diadema, possesses a pair of short terminal spines[3].

    Systematics

     src=
    A swarm of Idiomysis hovering next to the coral in Mozambique Channel.

    There are six species described so far in the genus[2]:

     src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Idiomysis.

    Ecology

    Idiomysis live in the small groups (called swarms) of 5 to more than 40 individuals, which hover over sea bottom during a day and probably feed on the seafloor on the nighttime.[4] All known species are found in the shallow coastal waters, however they inhabit different niches and can be found on coral reefs, seaweeds, rocks or sandy bottoms[4]. Two species – I. inermis and I. tsurnamali – are known for commensal relationship with the sea anemones[4], whereas I. diadema is associated with the sea urchin Diadema[3]. There are also reports of Idiomysis hovering above upside-down jellyfish, Cassiopea[4]. Possibly mysids gain protection and/or food supply from this relationship, however the exact nature of the relation has not been studied[4].

    Distribution

    The described species are known from Red Sea (I. diadema and I. tsurnamali), Mozambique Channel (I. mozambica), Gulf of Mannar (I. inermis), western coast of Australia (I. inermis), East China Sea (I. japonica) and western coast of South Africa (I. robusta)[2].

    References

    1. ^ a b c Walter Medley Tattersall (1922). "Indian Mysidacea". Records of the Indian Museum. 24: 445–504..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ a b c WoRMS (2016). "Mysida". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2016-12-15.
    3. ^ a b c Karl J. Wittmann (2016). "Description of Idiomysis diadema sp. nov. (Mysida, Mysidae, Anisomysini), associated with Diadema urchins in the Red Sea; with nomenclatorial notes on its genus". Crustaceana. 89 (5): 611–623. doi:10.1163/15685403-00003542.
    4. ^ a b c d e R. N. Bhaduri; A. L. Crowther (2015). "Association of the mysid Idiomysis inermis with the sea anemone Stichodactyla haddoni in Moreton Bay, Australia". Marine Biodiveersity. doi:10.1007/s12526-015-0408-7.

    license
    cc-by-sa-3.0
    copyright
    Wikipedia authors and editors
    original
    visit source
    partner site
    wikipedia
    ID
    7515180056904c6f9eec92bf81cddf3b