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Bristle Footed Annelids

Canalipalpata Rouse & Fauchald 1997

Canalipalpata

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Sabellastarte magnifica, magnificent feather duster worm

Canalipalpata, also known as bristle-footed annelids or fan-head worms, is an order of polychaete worms, with 31 families in it including the suborder Sabellida (families Serpulidae (tubeworms) and Sabellidae (fanworms and feather duster worms) and the Alvinellidae, a family of deep-sea worms associated with hydrothermal vents.

The Canalipalpata have no teeth or jaws.[1] Most are filter feeders. They have grooved palpi, which are covered in cilia. These cilia are used to transport food particles to the mouth. However, the cilia and grooves have been lost in the Siboglinidae family.[2]

Fossil record

The earliest known member of the Canalipalpata is Terebellites franklini, which was found in the Clouds Rapids Formation of Newfoundland, and dates from the mid Cambrian (St David's series).[3]

Use in aquaria

Many species of Canalipalpata are visually attractive. Fanworms and Christmas tree worms (a type of serpulid) are recommended as species for beginners to keep in a marine aquarium.[4]

Taxonomy

Order Canalipalpata

References

  1. ^ Robert D. Barnes (1980). Invertebrate Zoology (4th ed.). Holt-Saunders. ISBN 4-8337-0001-8.
  2. ^ Peter Ax (1996). Multicellular Animals: The Phylogenetic System of the Metazoa. 2. Springer-Verlag. ISBN 3-540-67406-3.
  3. ^ M.J.Benton, ed. (1993). The Fossil Record 2. Chapman & Hall. ISBN 0-412-39380-8.
  4. ^ Martyn Haywood; Sue Wells (1989). The Manual of Marine Invertebrates. Salamander Books Limited, London. ISBN 0-86101-474-X.

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Canalipalpata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= Sabellastarte magnifica, magnificent feather duster worm

Canalipalpata, also known as bristle-footed annelids or fan-head worms, is an order of polychaete worms, with 31 families in it including the suborder Sabellida (families Serpulidae (tubeworms) and Sabellidae (fanworms and feather duster worms) and the Alvinellidae, a family of deep-sea worms associated with hydrothermal vents.

The Canalipalpata have no teeth or jaws. Most are filter feeders. They have grooved palpi, which are covered in cilia. These cilia are used to transport food particles to the mouth. However, the cilia and grooves have been lost in the Siboglinidae family.

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Classification

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Zrzavý et al (2009) suggest the traditional "Scolecida" and "Canalipalpata" are both polyphyletic, forming instead two clades: one including Cirratuliformia and the "sabelloid-spionoid clade" (incl. Sternaspis, Sabellidae-Serpulidae, Sabellariidae, Spionida s. str.), the other ("terebelloid-capitelloid clade") including Terebelliformia, Arenicolidae-Maldanidae, and Capitellidae-Echiurida.
Sabellariidae lie outside Sabellida and have Spionida affinities according to Capa et al (2012)

References

  • Zrzavý, J.; Xíha, P.; Piálek, L.; Janouškovec, J. (). Phylogeny of Annelida (Lophotrochozoa): total-evidence analysis of morphology and six genes - art. no. . Bmc Evolutionary Biology : -.
  • Capa, Maria; Hutchings, Pat; Peart, Rachael. . Systematic revision of Sabellariidae (Polychaeta) and their relationships with other polychaetes using morphological and DNA sequence data. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society (): -

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bibliographic citation
Zrzavý, J.; Xíha, P.; Piálek, L.; Janouškovec, J. (2009). Phylogeny of Annelida (Lophotrochozoa): total-evidence analysis of morphology and six genes - art. no. 189. Bmc Evolutionary Biology 9: 189-189. Capa, Maria; Hutchings, Pat; Peart, Rachael. 2012. Systematic revision of Sabellariidae (Polychaeta) and their relationships with other polychaetes using morphological and DNA sequence data. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 164(2): 245-284
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