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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Adriana Saroki, University of Michigan Biological Station
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Behavior

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To locate prey, H. convergens uses primarily visual, olfactory, and chemical cues. Closely related species of coccinellids have been found to respond to aphid pheromones and other chemical cues. Honeydew secreted by aphid prey is also thought to be a significant chemical cue to coccinellids predators, and has even been shown to increase oviposition in H. convergens and other Coccinellidae. Larvae are also thought to respond to aphid chemical cues while searching for prey, though it is likely that prey search by larvae is more random than adults. Larvae rely heavily on tactile cues, and have been shown to follow along leaf veins until they either detect olfaction-based cues or just bump into aphid prey.

Communication Channels: visual ; tactile ; chemical

Perception Channels: visual ; tactile ; chemical

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Conservation Status

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Hippodamia convergens has no special conservation status.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Life Cycle

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Hippodamia convergens goes through the same life cycle as other Coccinellids, progressing from the egg stage to the larval stage, then to pupation and finally adulthood. Eggs hatch after approximately a week, and then larvae develop through four instars over the course of two to three weeks. Convergent lady beetles are unique in that during food scarcity, they are able to alter their development in response. Individuals wait until they are between 5 to 35 mg (optimal weight being greater than 15 mg) to go through the process of pupation. It is common for a final instar larva to attach itself to the surface of leaves right before molting and forming a pupa. H. convergens generally has two generations a year, one in the spring and the other in the fall. During times of food scarcity or extreme temperatures, adults of H. convergens can enter diapause. The first generation of the year will often diapause at some point during the summer, while the second generation will diapause over winter.

Development - Life Cycle: metamorphosis ; diapause

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Benefits

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Although Hippodamia convergens is helpful and often transported for agricultural purposes, this species can act as a transmitter for diseases and parasites. The trade and transportation of this lady beetle has increased the risk of introducing new pathogens into the United States.

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Benefits

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Hippodamia convergens is of great economic benefit to humans. Convergent lady beetles are reared and sold as pest control agents for farms and gardens, since they are the natural predators of agricultural pests, particularly many species of aphids and scale insects.

Positive Impacts: controls pest population

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Associations

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Hippodamia convergens is a significant predator of many agricultural pests, particularly aphids. They also feed on a variety of other insects. Birds and generalist predatory insects such as Geocoris bullatus and Nabis alternatus feed on H. convergens. Pathogens such as Microsporidia use convergent lady beetles as hosts, which causes delayed larval development. These pathogens are often horizontally transmitted among this species, as H. convergens will cannibalize its eggs and larvae in times of low prey density. The braconid wasp Perilitus coccinellae is known to use H. convergens as a host. Parasitoid hymenopterans such as Dinocampus coccinellae have been found to also use convergent lady beetles as hosts, with females being infected at a higher rate than males. Parasites travel with their host lady beetles that are shipped for agricultural control purposes, which has likely caused an increase of parasites in the regions to which they are shipped.

Commensal/Parasitic Species:

  • Microsporidia
  • Perilitus coccinellae
  • Dinocampus coccinellae
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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Trophic Strategy

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Hippodamia convergens is predacious. It feeds on other insects and sometimes on small arthropods. Convergent lady beetles typically eat aphids, scale insects, and plant mites. Cotton, pea, melon, cabbage, potato, green peach, and corn leaf aphids are all prey that convergent lady beetles have been reported to eat. This makes this species a useful tool in controlling aphid populations on farms. Hippodamia convergens also eat the eggs and larvae of other insects, such as stinkbugs, asparagus beetles, and potato psyllids. Although both immature beetles and adults eat mostly aphids, during the fall when they are getting ready for hibernation, adults will feed on pollen to gain extra fat for hibernation. When there is food scarcity, it is not uncommon for coccinellids to become cannibalistic and eat their own larvae and eggs.

These beetles have a large appetite and may consume between 40 to 75 aphids per day. It has been shown that temperatures around 23 degrees Celsius cause these lady beetles to eat the most aphids. This indicates that the species is better at controlling aphid populations at this higher temperature.

Animal Foods: insects; terrestrial non-insect arthropods

Plant Foods: pollen

Primary Diet: carnivore (Insectivore )

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Adriana Saroki, University of Michigan Biological Station
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Distribution

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Hippodamia convergens can be found in most of the Nearctic and Neotropical regions. It is a common species throughout the United States, ranging from New Jersey to Texas to California. It also common in Canada and South America.

Biogeographic Regions: nearctic (Native ); neotropical (Native )

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Habitat

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Hippodamia convergens, the convergent lady beetle, is found in a diverse array of habitats including forests, grasslands, agricultural fields, and suburban gardens. Convergent lady beetles are found on crops in gardens and farms where there are plenty of aphids and other prey to eat. Typical crops on which they live are wheat, sorghum, and alfalfa. During the winter, H. convergens can be found under logs, ground-covering vegetation, and even in buildings.

Habitat Regions: terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; forest

Other Habitat Features: suburban ; agricultural

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Life Expectancy

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It takes about 4 to 7 weeks for H. convergens to develop from egg to an adult. Adults live for an extended period after that, with the second generation overwintering.

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Morphology

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Hippodamia convergens is semi-hemispherically shaped and has elytra that are yellow/red or tannish red with 12 black spots. The beetle does not have the typical oval shape of most lady beetles and the elytra are not as curvaceous. Hippodamia convergens has three separate spots on the posterior of the elytra, while their legs and underside are all black. These beetles have short legs with 3 segmented tarsi and short antennae as well. The prothorax is black with a white border and white lines that are directed inward towards one another and the abdomen; they are converging, thus giving this beetle its name. The prothorax does not align perfectly with the front edge of the elytra.

Eggs are typically 1 to 1.5 mm, elongated, and pointed at one end. Larvae look like alligators and are distinct because of the orange spots that they have on their prothorax. Pupae are orange and black and have a hemispherical shape.

Range length: 4 to 5 mm.

Range wingspan: 2.7 to 4.4 mm.

Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; heterothermic ; bilateral symmetry ; poisonous

Sexual Dimorphism: sexes alike

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Associations

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Generalist insect predators such as Geocoris bullatus and Nabis alternatus are known to eat eggs of H. convergens. Birds are often predators of H. convergens as well. In defense, the red and black coloration of the elytra of convergent lady beetles serves as warning coloration. Avian predators have been shown to recognize lady beetles with red color and black spots and eat them less frequently than lady beetles with no spots or different coloration. Additionally, like most coccinellids, H. convergens can likely bleed toxins from the joints in its exoskeleton.

Known Predators:

  • Birds
  • Nabis alternatus
  • Geocoris bullatus

Anti-predator Adaptations: aposematic

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Reproduction

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No information was found about the mating systems of these lady beetles specifically, but it is likely that they mate multiple times with multiple mates, as do other Coccinellidae.

Mating System: polygynandrous (promiscuous)

Hippodamia convergens is a bivoltine species, with two generations a year, one in the spring and the other in the fall. Females of H. convergens are able to enter into reproductive diapause during dry seasons or times of extreme temperature, when food resources are not plentiful enough for it to reproduce successfully. Egg laying generally coincides with aphid population cycles, with the most egg laying taking place when aphid populations are at their peak. Females have been shown to increase oviposition in the presence of aphids. A female can produce 200 to 500 eggs in her lifetime.

Breeding interval: H. convergens breeds continuously after reaching sexual maturity, while aphid numbers are high.

Breeding season: One generation mates in early spring, while the other generation mates in early fall.

Range eggs per season: 200 to 500.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); oviparous

No information was found about parental investment in this species, but it is likely that, as with other coccinellids, it provides only nutrients in the egg as parental investment.

Parental Investment: pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female)

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Saroki, A. 2013. "Hippodamia convergens" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Hippodamia_convergens.html
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Hippodamia convergens ( Catalan; Valencian )

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Aquest article o secció no cita les fonts o necessita més referències per a la seva verificabilitat.

Hippodamia convergens és una espècie de coleòpter de la família Coccinellidae, una de les marietes més comunes a Amèrica. La seva forma és més allargada que la d'altres espècies de marietes, i mesura entre 4 i 7 mil·límetres de longitud. En el cap té un cridaner dibuix en blanc i negre. Els èlitres són de color vermell amb punts negres, en nombre variable (13 com màxim).

Com les altres espècies de marieta, la seva presa més freqüent són els àfids o pulgons, encara que s'alimenta també d'altres petits insectes. Viuen aproximadament un any. El seu cicle vital està relacionat amb el dels pulgons. Neixen a l'abril o maig: cada femella posa entre 200 i 1.000 ous de petita grandària dels quals neixen les larves, que en l'espai d'un mes multipliquen per 4 la seva grandària. A continuació passen a la fase de pupa, que dura uns 12 dies i després es transformen en adults.

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Hippodamia convergens

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Hippodamia convergens, commonly known as the convergent lady beetle, is one of the most common lady beetles in North America and is found throughout the continent. Aphids form their main diet and they are used for the biological control of these pests.

Range

Convergent lady beetles are native to North America, but have also been imported and established in South America by importing beetles from California.[1]

Life cycle

The female lady beetle lays 200 to 300 eggs over several months during spring and early summer. The eggs are small and spindle-shaped and are laid near the prey in upright batches of fifteen to thirty eggs. The larvae are dark and somewhat alligator-shaped.[2] Once the larvae begin feeding, they grow quickly and molt four times over a period of up to a month. The pupal stage lasts about a week and mating takes place soon after adult eclosion. If the food supply is abundant, the female may start laying within about a week of mating, but if it is scarce, she may wait for up to nine months.[3]

Biology

 src=
Convergent lady beetles adult aggregation

The first larvae that hatch in each batch may start by eating the unhatched eggs. This may provide energy for the larvae before they find any aphids. Fourth-instar larvae may consume about fifty aphids per day and adults may eat about twenty. When aphids are scarce, the adults can eat honeydew, nectar and pollen or even petals and other soft parts of plants.[4] However they must consume aphids in order to reproduce.[5] In the western United States, these beetles may spend up to nine months in diapause in large aggregations in mountain valleys, far from their aphid food sources. In spring, the adults spread out and search for suitable sites to lay their eggs where aphids are plentiful. This dispersal trait is especially marked in this species as compared to other lady beetles.[2]

Biological control

Convergent lady beetles are also used for augmentative biological control to temporarily increase predator numbers to control aphids. The species is available commercially in North America, but because of the overwintering habits of non-reproductive adults, released beetles tend to quickly disperse from their release site. Adults released in enclosed settings such as greenhouses can contribute to lower aphid numbers.[6]

Natural enemies

Entomopathogenic fungi used as biopesticides such as Metarhizium anisopliae, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, and Beauveria bassiana can also infect larvae.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Obrycki, John J.; Kring, Timothy J. (January 1998). "PREDACEOUS COCCINELLIDAE IN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL". Annual Review of Entomology. 43 (1): 295–321. doi:10.1146/annurev.ento.43.1.295.
  2. ^ a b Cornell University
  3. ^ Balduf, W. V. (1935). The Bionomics of Entomophagous Coleoptera. St. Louis, MO: John S. Swift Co.
  4. ^ Hagen, Kenneth S. (1960). "Biological Control with Lady Beetles". Plants and Gardens: the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Record. 16 (3): 28–35.
  5. ^ Haug, G. W. (1938). "Rearing the Coccinellid Hippodamia convergens on Frozen Aphids". Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 31 (2): 240–248.
  6. ^ Obrycki, John J.; Harwood, James D.; Kring, Timothy J.; O'Neil, Robert J. (November 2009). "Aphidophagy by Coccinellidae: Application of biological control in agroecosystems". Biological Control. 51 (2): 244–254. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.05.009.

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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary

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Hippodamia convergens, commonly known as the convergent lady beetle, is one of the most common lady beetles in North America and is found throughout the continent. Aphids form their main diet and they are used for the biological control of these pests.

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Hippodamia convergens ( Spanish; Castilian )

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Hippodamia convergens, la catarina convergente, es una especie de coleóptero cucujoideo de la familia Coccinellidae. Es nativa de Norteamérica, donde se encuentra en todo el territorio. Ha sido introducida a Sudamérica con el fin de realizar un control biológico contra los áfidos,[1]​ de los que es depredadora.[2]

Descripción

Su forma es más alargada que la de otras especies de mariquitas. Las hembras miden alrededor de 7 mm de longitud, los machos unos 6 mm. Los élitros son de color rojo con puntos negros, en número variable (13 como máximo). En la cabeza tiene un llamativo dibujo en blanco y negro al que debe su nombre: dos rayas que convergen.

Como otras especies de mariquita, su presa más frecuente son los áfidos o pulgones, con cuyo ciclo vital está relacionado el suyo propio. Por lo general hay dos generaciones al año. Cada hembra pone entre 200 y 1000 huevos en grupos de 10 a 30, en lugares estratégicos donde las larvas puedan acceder a alimento recién nacidas. Las larvas son alargadas y negras al nacer, y con el tiempo adquieren una coloración naranja. Cuando alcanzan los 7 mm, pasan a la fase de pupa. Esta dura unos 12 días, para después transformarse en adultas.[3]

Biología

 src=
Agrupación invernal

En el oeste de los Estados Unidos los adultos pasan una diapausa de nueve meses en grandes grupos en los valles de las montañas y sin alimento de áfidos. En la primavera migran hacia lugares con abundancia de alimento, donde depositan sus huevos. Este movimiento migratorio puede ser sumamente numeroso.[4][5]

Taxonomía

Hippodamia convergens fue descrita en 1842 por Félix Édouard Guérin-Méneville.[6]

Etimología

Hippodamia: nombre genérico dado por Hipodamía, una figura de la mitología griega
convergens: epíteto latino que significa «convergente» y se rfiere al diseño del dorso

Referencias

  1. Escalante G., José Ángel (1972). «Datos sobre la biología de Hippodamia convergens Guerin en la localidad del Cusco». Revista peruana de Entomología 15 (2): 237-239. Consultado el 22 de febrero de 2017.
  2. «Cría masiva y capacidad depredadora de Hippodamia convergens Guérin (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae)». Folia Entomológica Mexicana 40 (2): 155-168. Consultado el 22 de febrero de 2017.
  3. Aristizábal, Luis F., y Steven P. Arthurs (mayo de 2014). «Convergent Ladybug». University of Florida (en inglés). Consultado el 22 de febrero de 2017.
  4. Cornell University
  5. Balduf, W. V. (1935). The Bionomics of Entomophagous Coleoptera. St. Louis, MO: John S. Swift Co.
  6. González F., Guillermo (2009). «Hippodamia convergens (Guerin-Meneville, 1842)». Coccinellidae de Argentina. Consultado el 22 de febrero de 2017.

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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( Spanish; Castilian )

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Hippodamia convergens, la catarina convergente, es una especie de coleóptero cucujoideo de la familia Coccinellidae. Es nativa de Norteamérica, donde se encuentra en todo el territorio. Ha sido introducida a Sudamérica con el fin de realizar un control biológico contra los áfidos,​ de los que es depredadora.​

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Hippodamia convergens ( French )

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Hippodamia convergens est une espèce de coléoptères de la famille des coccinellidés, originaire d'Amérique du Nord, qui vit dans les champs, les prés et les jardins.

Vraisemblablement la plus commune des Coccinelles d'Amérique du Nord, Hippodamia convergens peut atteindre approximativement 6 mm de long.

Description

Ses élytres sont un peu allongés, orangeâtres et ornés de deux taches blanches et sept points noirs. Deux autres points noirs peuvent se former à la base des élytres. Sa tête est noire et ornée d'une tache blanche un peu en W. Son large pronotum noir est orné d'une tache blanche et de deux petits points blancs. Ses antennes et ses mandibules sont courtes et brun orangé. Ses pattes sont brun orangeâtre, mais les fémurs sont noirs.

Cycle

La femelle peut pondre de 10 à 50 œufs par jour, souvent groupés à proximité d’une colonie d’Aphididae.

La larve peut atteindre 6 mm de long, et s’aventurer à 12 mètres du lieu de ponte.

Alimentation

L'adulte, comme la larve se nourrissent d’Aphididae, de Cochenilles et autres petits insectes. La larve peut consommer 60 aphidés par jour, et l'adulte jusqu’à 5 000 dans sa vie active.

Galerie

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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( French )

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Hippodamia convergens est une espèce de coléoptères de la famille des coccinellidés, originaire d'Amérique du Nord, qui vit dans les champs, les prés et les jardins.

Vraisemblablement la plus commune des Coccinelles d'Amérique du Nord, Hippodamia convergens peut atteindre approximativement 6 mm de long.

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Hippodamia convergens ( Latvian )

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Hippodamia convergens ir mārīšu suga.

Izplatība

Hippodamia convergens ir plaši izplatīta ZiemeļamerikāMeksikā, ASV un Kanādas rietumos, un Centrālamerikā. Dienvidamerikā sastopama Kolumbijā.[1]

Ekoloģija

Hippodamia convergens ir svarīgs dabisks ienaidnieks dažādiem kukaiņiem, tajā skaitā laputīm, bruņutīm, tripšiem un citiem mīkstķermeņu kukaiņiem. Toties mārītes var baroties arī ar ziedputekšņiem un ar nektāru, ja ir kukaiņu upuru trūkums.[1]

Hippodamia convergens upuru sarakstā ir:[2]

Atsauces

  1. 1,0 1,1 Featured Creatures. convergent lady beetle
  2. Luis F. Aristizábal & Steven P. Arthurs. (2014) Convergent Lady Beetle Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Insecta: Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). IFAS Extensions
  3. Travis M. Hinkelman & Brigitte Tenhumberg. (2012) Larval Performance and Kill Rate of Convergent Ladybird Beetles,Hippodamia convergens, on Black Bean Aphids, Aphis fabae, and Pea Aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Journal of Insect Science, 13(46)
  4. F. Colares, J. P. Michaud, C. L. Bain & J. B. Torres. Relative Toxicity of Two Aphicides to Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): Implications for Integrated Management of Sugarcane Aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae). J Econ Entomol. 2017 Feb 1;110(1):52-58 doi:10.1093/jee/tow265
  5. R. M. Hamilton, E. B. Doğan, G. B. Schaalje & G. M. Booth. Olfactory Response of the Lady Beetle Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to Prey Related Odors, Including a Scanning Electron Microscopy Study of the Antennal Sensilla. 1999 Entomological Society of America
  6. Norman C. Elliott, Robert W. Kieckhefer, Robert W. Kieckhefer & Mpho W. Phoofolo. Functional Response of Hippodamia convergens to Sitobion avenae on Wheat Plants in the Laboratory. Southwestern Entomologist 36(4):423-431. 2011 doi:10.3958/059.036.0404
  7. Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc, 1909) — Psyl'list (hemiptera-databases.org).
  8. Stephen R. Clarke. (2013) Pine Tortoise Scale]. Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 57.
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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( Latvian )

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Hippodamia convergens ir mārīšu suga.

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Hippodamia convergens ( Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan )

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Specimene de Hippodamia convergens convergând
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Hippodamia convergens cunscută și ca buburuza convergentă este una dintre cele mai comune specii din familia Coccinellidae din America de Nord și se găsește răspândită de-a lungul continentului. Principala lor sursă de hrană sunt afidele iar specia este folosită și ca agent biologic de control.

Ciclul de viață

De-a lungul unei perioade de câteva luni dintre primăvară și vară, femela depune 200 până la 300 de ouă. Ouăle sunt mici și fusiforme. larvele sunt sunt negre și au oarecum formă de aligator. [1] Odată ce larvele încep să se hrănească, ele cresc rapid și năpârlesc de patru ori într-o lună. Perioada pupală durează o săptămână iar împerechearea are loc imediat după aceea. Dacă în zonă se găsesc afide din abundență, femela se va împerechea mai repede, dar dacă este invers, ea va aștepta până la maximum nouă luni. [2]


Referințe

  1. ^ Cornell University
  2. ^ Balduf, W. V. (1935). The Bionomics of Entomophagous Coleoptera. St. Louis, MO: John S. Swift Co.

Surse externe

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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan )

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 src= Specimene de Hippodamia convergens convergând Wikispecies Wikispecies conține informații legate de Convergent lady beetle

Hippodamia convergens cunscută și ca buburuza convergentă este una dintre cele mai comune specii din familia Coccinellidae din America de Nord și se găsește răspândită de-a lungul continentului. Principala lor sursă de hrană sunt afidele iar specia este folosită și ca agent biologic de control.

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Hippodamia convergens ( Vietnamese )

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Hippodamia convergens là một loài bọ rùa phổ biến nhất ở Bắc Mỹ. Rệp vừng là thức ăn chính của loài bọ rùa này và chúng được sử dụng cho việc kiểm soát sinh học đối với các loài gây hại.

Chú thích

Tham khảo


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Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( Vietnamese )

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Hippodamia convergens là một loài bọ rùa phổ biến nhất ở Bắc Mỹ. Rệp vừng là thức ăn chính của loài bọ rùa này và chúng được sử dụng cho việc kiểm soát sinh học đối với các loài gây hại.

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Hippodamia convergens ( Russian )

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Подцарство: Эуметазои
Без ранга: Первичноротые
Без ранга: Линяющие
Без ранга: Panarthropoda
Надкласс: Шестиногие
Класс: Насекомые
Надотряд: Coleopterida
Подотряд: Разноядные жуки
Инфраотряд: Кукуйиформные
Надсемейство: Кукуйоидные
Семейство: Божьи коровки
Подсемейство: Coccinellinae
Триба: Coccinellini
Род: Hippodamia
Вид: Hippodamia convergens
Международное научное название

Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842

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ITIS 114331NCBI 64696EOL 1174377FW 290009

Hippodamia convergens — один из самых обычных и самых изученных видов божьих коровок в Центральной и Северной Америке. Туловища имаго слегка удлинённые; в длину достигает 4—7 мм. Надкрылья красные и обычно 13-и точечные, реже имеют меньше точек. Переднеспинка чёрная с белым рисунком[1].

Встречаются на пшенице, сорго, люцерне обыкновенной, овощах, тепличных зерновых растениях, а также на других злаковых которых атакует тля, которая является основной пищей для личинок и взрослых особей[2].

Галерея

  • Convergent Lady Beetle.JPG

Примечания

  1. Cornell University
  2. Hagen, Kenneth S. 1960 Biological Control with Lady Beetles Plants and Gardens: the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Record Vol.16[3] (Autumn):28-35
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Авторы и редакторы Википедии

Hippodamia convergens: Brief Summary ( Russian )

provided by wikipedia русскую Википедию

Hippodamia convergens — один из самых обычных и самых изученных видов божьих коровок в Центральной и Северной Америке. Туловища имаго слегка удлинённые; в длину достигает 4—7 мм. Надкрылья красные и обычно 13-и точечные, реже имеют меньше точек. Переднеспинка чёрная с белым рисунком.

Встречаются на пшенице, сорго, люцерне обыкновенной, овощах, тепличных зерновых растениях, а также на других злаковых которых атакует тля, которая является основной пищей для личинок и взрослых особей.

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Авторы и редакторы Википедии