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Bakul

Mimusops elengi L.

Brief Summary

    Mimusops elengi: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia
    This article is about a species of flowering plants called Medlar. For other uses, see Medlar.

     src= The ripe fruit has many traditional uses.

    Mimusops elengi is a medium-sized evergreen tree found in tropical forests in South Asia, Southeast Asia and northern Australia. English common names include Spanish cherry, medlar, and bullet wood. Its timber is valuable, the fruit is edible, and it is used in traditional medicine. As the trees give thick shade and flowers emit fragrance, it is a prized collection of gardens.

    Its flower is the provincial flower of Yala Province, Thailand.

Comprehensive Description

    Mimusops elengi
    provided by wikipedia
    This article is about a species of flowering plants called Medlar. For other uses, see Medlar.

     src=
    The ripe fruit has many traditional uses.

    Mimusops elengi is a medium-sized evergreen tree found in tropical forests in South Asia, Southeast Asia and northern Australia. English common names include Spanish cherry,[1] medlar,[1] and bullet wood.[2] Its timber is valuable, the fruit is edible, and it is used in traditional medicine. As the trees give thick shade and flowers emit fragrance, it is a prized collection of gardens.[3]

    Its flower is the provincial flower of Yala Province, Thailand.[4]

    Tree description

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    Flowers in Hyderabad, India
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    Flowers are made into garlands
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    Bark

    Bullet wood is an evergreen tree reaching a height of about 16 m (52 ft). It flowers in April, and fruiting occurs in June. Leaves are glossy, dark green, oval-shaped, 5–14 cm (2.0–5.5 in) long, and 2.5–6 cm (0.98–2.36 in) wide. Flowers are cream, hairy, and scented. Bark is thick and appears dark brownish black or grayish black in colour, with striations and a few cracks on the surface. The tree may reach up to a height of 9–18 m (30–59 ft) with about 1 m (3 ft 3 in) in circumference.

    Ayurvedic uses

    The bark, flowers, fruits, and seeds of Bakula[5] are used in Ayurvedic medicine in which it is purported to be astringent, cooling, anthelmintic, tonic, and febrifuge. It is mainly used for dental ailments such as bleeding gums, pyorrhea, dental caries, and loose teeth.[5][unreliable source?]

    Other uses

    • The edible fruit is softly hairy becoming smooth, ovoid, bright red-orange when ripe.
    • The wood is a luxurious wood that is extremely hard, strong and tough, and rich deep red in color. The heart wood is sharply defined from the sapwood. It works easily and takes a beautiful polish. Weight is 1008 kg per cubic meter.

    References

     src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mimusops elengi.
    1. ^ a b Bailey, L.H.; Bailey, E.Z.; the staff of the Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium. 1976. Hortus third: A concise dictionary of plants cultivated in the United States and Canada. Macmillan, New York.
    2. ^ "Mimusops elengi". Biodiversity India. Retrieved 14 October 2013..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    3. ^ "Maulsari". flowersofindia.com. Retrieved 14 October 2013.
    4. ^ ประวัติ จังหวัด ยะลา-Yala Province
    5. ^ a b "Bakula – an Indian plant with interesting properties". Natural Actives. Retrieved 14 October 2013.

Distribution

    Distribution
    provided by eFloras
    Distribution: India, Ceylon, Malay peninsula; often cultivated elsewhere.

Morphology

    Comments
    provided by eFloras
    The wood is used for building purposes, piles, bridges, agricultural implements and oil mills. The fruit is eaten; it is sometimes used for making preserves and pickles. The caducous corollas are used for making fragrant garlands. The bark is astringent and tonic and is used in diarrhoea and dysentry. A decoction of bark is used for gargle.
    Description
    provided by eFloras
    A large evergreen tree, stem cylindrical, bark dark grey, smooth, not deeply furrowed. Leaves alternate, broadly ovate, 3.5-4-5 x 7-10.5 cm, base cuneate, apex acuminate, entire or slightly wavy, glabrous, petiolate, petiole 2-3.5 cm long. Flowers axillary solitary or fascicled, creamish white, fragrant, c. 15 mm in diameter, pedicel c. 2 cm long, hairy. Calyx 6-lobed, lobes free, lanceolate, tomentose. Corolla tube very short, lobes 24 in 2 series. Stamens 8, anthers subsessile, staminodes hairy. Ovary pubescent. Fruit ovoid, 2.5-4 cm long, orange, pubescent when young, with persistent calyx.

Cyclicity