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Distribution in Egypt

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Mediterranean region and Sinai.

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Global Distribution

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Atlantic Islands, Mediterranean region, west Europe, Black Sea coasts.

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Habitat

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Maritime sands.

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Life Expectancy

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Perennial.

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Brief Summary

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Sea spurge is a strange looking plant, with its erect dense leaf-covered stems. Like all spurges, it contains a white toxic milky sap. Because the actual blossom has been modified, it's difficult to identify it from the sepals. As the name indicates, this plant grows along sea coasts. It is native to Western Europe and the Mediterranean Sea. However, it cannot grow in cold climates. The delta region in the Netherlands is the most prominant area to find sea spurge and used to be the northern border. But because the winters have been reasonably mild in recent years, sea spurge is now found sporadically on the Wadden Islands among the flood mark.
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Euphorbia paralias

provided by wikipedia EN

Euphorbia paralias, the sea spurge, is a species of Euphorbia, native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia.[1]

It is a glaucous perennial plant growing up to 70 cm tall. The crowded leaves are elliptic-ovate (ovate toward the top of the stems) and 5 to 20 mm long.[2]

The species is widely naturalised in Australia.[2] It invades coastal areas, displacing local species and colonising open sand areas favoured by certain nesting birds.[3] Major eradication programmes have been undertaken in some areas, for example by Sea Spurge Remote Area Teams in Tasmania, with great success.[4]

References

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Euphorbia paralias - MHNT
  1. ^ "Euphorbia paralias". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 2008-12-23..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b James, T.A. & G.J. Harden. "Euphorbia paralias". PlantNET - New South Wales Flora Online. Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust, Sydney Australia. Retrieved 2008-12-23.
  3. ^ "Have you seen this beach weed?". Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (Tasmania). Archived from the original on 22 April 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
  4. ^ "EVALUATION REPORT DECEMBER 2015 - Wildcare SPRATS volunteer weed eradication project". Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
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Euphorbia paralias: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Euphorbia paralias, the sea spurge, is a species of Euphorbia, native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia.

It is a glaucous perennial plant growing up to 70 cm tall. The crowded leaves are elliptic-ovate (ovate toward the top of the stems) and 5 to 20 mm long.

The species is widely naturalised in Australia. It invades coastal areas, displacing local species and colonising open sand areas favoured by certain nesting birds. Major eradication programmes have been undertaken in some areas, for example by Sea Spurge Remote Area Teams in Tasmania, with great success.

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