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Cypripedium arietinum R. Br.

Brief Summary

    Cypripedium arietinum: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Cypripedium arietinum, the ram's head lady's slipper, is a rare orchid that grows in lightly shaded areas with calcareous soils. It is characteristic of the alvars around the Great Lakes in North America, as well as in New England. In Canada, it is found from Quebec to Saskatchewan, plus an isolated population in Nova Scotia, where it grows on gypsum based soils, 330 km away from the nearest population in Maine.

Comprehensive Description

    Cypripedium arietinum
    provided by wikipedia

    Cypripedium arietinum, the ram's head lady's slipper,[1] is a rare orchid that grows in lightly shaded areas with calcareous soils. It is characteristic of the alvars around the Great Lakes in North America, as well as in New England.[1][2] In Canada, it is found from Quebec to Saskatchewan, plus an isolated population in Nova Scotia, where it grows on gypsum based soils, 330 km away from the nearest population in Maine.[3][4]

    Description

    Cypripedium arietinum is a small lady's slipper which typically has 3, but sometimes 4-5, leaves. This species has a single flower on each stem having divided lateral sepals and a unique hairy pouch shaped like an funnel. The purplish-red flower has light venation and is white at the lip.

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    Cypripedium arietinum plants in the wild

    The plant grows to 10–40 cm (4–16 in), and the flowers may reach 1–2 cm (1234 in). It flowers from May to June, producing brownish-green flowers with a pink and white lip.

    The ram's head lady's slipper is difficult to cultivate, and rarely survives transplantation to a garden from the wild. It should never be removed from any natural area.

    Conservation

    Cypripedium arietinum is considered rare to extremely rare in all locations where it occurs.[3] More specifically, it is rare in Ontario[5] and rare in Manitoba. The ram's head lady's slipper is a threatened plant species other areas within its range, including Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, and Saskatchewan. It is believed to be extirpated in Connecticut. This species is listed as an endangered species in Nova Scotia.[6]

    References

    1. ^ a b "Cypripedium arietinum". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 1 July 2016..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Catling, P.M.; Brownell, V.R. (1999). "Alvars of the Great Lakes Region". In Anderson, R. C.; Fralish, J. S.; Baskin, J. M. Savannas, Barrens and Rock Outcrop Communities of North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 375–391.
    3. ^ a b Blaney, S.; Mazerolle, D. (2007). Nova Scotia Provincial Status Report on Ram's-Head Lady Slipper (Cypripredium arietinum R. Br.). Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources.
    4. ^ "Cypripedium arietinum". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2014.
    5. ^ Oldham, M.J.; Brinker, S.R. (2009). Rare Vascular Plants of Ontario (4th ed.). Peterborough, Ontario: Natural Heritage Information Centre, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.
    6. ^ "Species at Risk Overview". Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved 15 July 2018.

Distribution

    Distribution
    provided by eFloras
    Man., N.S., Ont., Que., Sask.; Conn., Maine, Mass., Mich., Minn., N.H., N.Y., Vt., Wis.

Morphology

    Description
    provided by eFloras
    Plants erect, 10–35 cm. Leaves 3–4, along middle portion of stem, spiraled to alternate, ascending to spreading; blade narrowly elliptic to ovate-lanceolate or oblong, 5–11 × 1.3–3.5 cm. Flowers usually solitary (rarely 2 in forma biflorum P. M. Brown); sepals green with reddish brown markings; dorsal sepal broadly elliptic to ovate-lanceolate, 15–25 × 5–10 mm; lateral sepals distinct, 12–20 × 1.5–4 mm; petals somewhat spreading, same color as sepals, somewhat spirally twisted, linear- to linear-lanceolate, 11–24 × 1–2 mm; lip white with green apex, usually with extensive reddish reticulations often merging toward apex, adaxially swollen near middle, 10–16 mm, apex abruptly deflected downward, orifice basal, 7–12 mm; staminode suborbicular. 2n = 20.

Habitat

    Habitat
    provided by eFloras
    Dry to moist open coniferous and mixed forests, coniferous-forested fens, beach thickets; mostly 0--400m.

Cyclicity

    Flowering/Fruiting
    provided by eFloras
    Flowering May--Jun.