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Aloe cooperi Baker

Brief Summary

    Aloe cooperi: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Aloe cooperi, also known as Cooper's aloe and as iPutumane in Zulu, is a succulent species that is endemic to Southern Africa. It has significant cultural and economic value to the Zulu people of South Africa.

Comprehensive Description

    Aloe cooperi
    provided by wikipedia

    Aloe cooperi, also known as Cooper's aloe[1] and as iPutumane in Zulu, is a succulent species that is endemic to Southern Africa. It has significant cultural and economic value to the Zulu people of South Africa.

    Distribution

    This plant can be found along the southern warm coastal parts of Kwazulu-Natal and north up to the colder mountainous regions of Swaziland and Mpumalanga.[2]

    Uses

    • Young shoots and flowers are often cooked and eaten as vegetables by the Zulu people, they also believe that smoke from burning leaves in the cattle kraal will prevent the effects on cattle of eating improper food.[3]
    • The plant's juice has been fed to horses to rid them of ticks.[4]
    • The plant attracts nectar feeding birds, this made it a popular garden plant in South Africa.[5]

    References

    1. ^ "ITIS - Aloe cooperi". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 31 December 2015..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Court, Doreen (2000). Succulent Flora of Southern Africa. CRC Press. ISBN 9789058093233.
    3. ^ "Aloe cooperi". www.plantzafrica.com. Retrieved 2015-12-31.
    4. ^ "Operation wildflower".
    5. ^ "Aloe cooperi". lifestyleseeds.co.za. Retrieved 2015-12-31.
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