dcsimg

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors
The fairyfly (Megaphragma caribea Delvare, 1993) measures just 0.1778 mm long (0.007 inches). It is the smallest insect known. There are many smaller animals, such as nematodes and rotifers. It is a parasitic wasp which lives on the island of Guadelupe in the eastern Caribbean.
license
cc-by-3.0
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Associations

provided by EOL authors
Host: Selenothrips rubrocinctus, Thripidae, Thysanoptera
license
cc-by-3.0
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Associations

provided by EOL authors
Members of the genus Megaphragma are eggs parasites of thrips (Thysanoptera) (Doutt & Viggiani 1968, Lin 1994). Megaphragma caribea was described from eggs of Selenothrips rubrocinctus found on guavas, Psidium guajava in Guadeloupe in 1988 (Delvare 1993).
license
cc-by-3.0
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Diagnostic Description

provided by EOL authors
Like other members of the genus Megaphragma, M. caribea is distinguished by its very small body size, extremely narrow, strap-like, sparsely-setose, long-fringed fore wings, and absence of metasomal spiracles (Pinto 2006, Pinto & Viggiani 2004). The antennae of M. caribea lack a funicle and have a two-segmented club (Delvare, G. 1993, Pinto & Viggiani 2004).
license
cc-by-3.0
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Megaphragma caribea

provided by wikipedia EN

Megaphragma caribea is a species of wasp.[1] It has been found acting as an egg parasitoid of Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis and Selenothrips rubrocinctus, which live on the plant Terminalia catappa in Columbia. It has a body length of only 181–224 μm. [2]

References

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Megaphragma caribea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Megaphragma caribea is a species of wasp. It has been found acting as an egg parasitoid of Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis and Selenothrips rubrocinctus, which live on the plant Terminalia catappa in Columbia. It has a body length of only 181–224 μm.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN