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Brief Summary

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Franklin's bumble bee (Bombus franklini) is a generalist forager and is known to nectar and collect pollen from several wildflowers, such as lupine (Lupinus spp.), California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), horsemint (Agastache urticofolia), mountain penny-royal (Monardella odoratissima), and vetch (Vicia spp.). The Franklin's bumble bee can be distinguished from other bumble bees by its distinctive pattern of yellow on the thorax that extends rearward forming an inverted U-shape. It has an almost completely black abdomen with two small white spots at the tip. Females have a predominantly black face with yellow on top of the head, while males have mostly yellow on the front of their faces. The Franklin's bumble bee has the smallest range of any bumble bee in the world, occurring between southern Oregon and northern California between the Coast and Sierra Cascade Ranges. It's range encompasses 190 miles north to south and 70 miles east to west. In the past the Franklin's bumble bee was abundant in its range, but is now feared to be extinct or nearly so. Surveys throughout the bee's range were unable to locate any individuals in 2004, 2005, and 2007; one worker bee was found in 2006. Franklin's bumble bee underwent extreme declines in the late 1990's, most likely because of exotic diseases that were inadvertently introduced through commercial bumble bee importations for greenhouse pollination of tomatoes. Other threats include habitat loss, pesticides, and pollution.
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Conservation Status

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In 2012, Bombus franklini was included among the world's 100 most threatened species in a report by the IUCN Species Survival Commission and the Zoological Society of London.

(Baillie & Butcher 2012; Harvey 2012)

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Dana Campbell
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Pollinator

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Franklin's bumble bee is a generalist forager and is known to nectar and collect pollen from several wildflowers, such as lupine (Lupinus spp.), California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), horsemint (Agastache urticofolia), mountain penny-royal (Monardella odoratissima), and vetch (Vicia spp.).
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Franklin's bumblebee

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Franklin's bumblebee (Bombus franklini) is known to be one of the most narrowly distributed bumblebee species,[2] making it a critically endangered bee of the western United States.[3] It is known only from a 190-by-70-mile (310 by 110 km) area in southern Oregon and northern California, between the Coast and Sierra-Cascade mountain ranges. It was last seen in 2006.[1] Franklin's bumblebee is known to collect and nectar pollen from several wildflowers, such as lupine, California poppy, and horsemint, which causes it to be classified as a generalist forager.[4]

Description

Franklin's bumblebee is distinguished from other bumblebees by a solid black abdomen, with yellow anteriorly on the thorax in a U-shaped design.[5] Females have black hair on their faces and the vertices, with some light hairs mixed above and below their antennal bases, while most similar bumblebee species have yellow.[6] Males of this species are similar except their malar spaces are long and wide, the hair on males' faces is yellow, and tergum 6 has some pale hairs laterally.[6]

Conservation

The last sighting of this bumblebee species was in Oregon in 2006. Some sources say this species is already extinct, but until more concrete evidence is shown, it has been assigned a conservation status rank of G1, which is critically imperiled. Furthermore, the population decreased drastically since 1998.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b C. M. Pollock & C. Hilton-Taylor (2008). "Bombus franklini". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008. |access-date= requires |url= (help)no identifier
  2. ^ Williams, Paul H.; et al. (2012). "Unveiling cryptic species of the bumblebee subgenus Bombus s. str. worldwide with COI barcodes (Hymenoptera: Apidae)". Systematics and Biodiversity. 10 (1): 21–56. doi:10.1080/14772000.2012.664574.
  3. ^ Jeff Barnard (24 June 2010). "Group seeks endangered listing for Franklin's bumblebee". USA Today. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  4. ^ Bombus franklini. Encyclopedia of Life.
  5. ^ Franklin's bumble bee may be extinct. Phys.org. 26 May 2009.
  6. ^ a b Bumble bees: Franklin’s bumble bee (Bombus franklini). Archived 2017-10-22 at the Wayback Machine Xerces Society.
  7. ^ NatureServe. 2015. Bombus franklini. NatureServe Explorer Version 7.1. Accessed 4 March 2016.

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Franklin's bumblebee: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Franklin's bumblebee (Bombus franklini) is known to be one of the most narrowly distributed bumblebee species, making it a critically endangered bee of the western United States. It is known only from a 190-by-70-mile (310 by 110 km) area in southern Oregon and northern California, between the Coast and Sierra-Cascade mountain ranges. It was last seen in 2006. Franklin's bumblebee is known to collect and nectar pollen from several wildflowers, such as lupine, California poppy, and horsemint, which causes it to be classified as a generalist forager.

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