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Brief Summary

    Broad-tailed gecko: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    The broad-tailed gecko, southern leaf-tailed gecko, or Sydney leaf-tailed gecko (Phyllurus platurus) is a common gecko of the family Carphodactylidae found in the Sydney Basin. The species uses its mottled colour to camouflage against bark or rock, and if threatened can drop its large fleshy tail as a decoy. The tail is also useful for fat storage. This species of gecko is available in captivity as a pet, they are a nocturnal ambush hunter, relying on camouflage and patience to catch prey. Primary prey items include large nocturnal insects such as spiders, cockroaches and beetles.

Comprehensive Description

    Broad-tailed gecko
    provided by wikipedia

    The broad-tailed gecko, southern leaf-tailed gecko, or Sydney leaf-tailed gecko[1][2][3] (Phyllurus platurus) is a common gecko of the family Carphodactylidae found in the Sydney Basin.[4][5] The species uses its mottled colour to camouflage against bark or rock, and if threatened can drop its large fleshy tail as a decoy. The tail is also useful for fat storage. This species of gecko is available in captivity as a pet, they are a nocturnal ambush hunter, relying on camouflage and patience to catch prey. Primary prey items include large nocturnal insects such as spiders, cockroaches and beetles.[6]

    Description

    Snout to vent length of 9.5 cm. Total length up to 15 cm. Mottled brown in colour with low bumpy tubercules over the body, original tails are mottled the same colour as the body with large slightly spiny tubercules, whereas regenerated tails are darker mottled and smooth.[2]

    Habitat

    Common generally in the greater Sydney Basin area, north to Newcastle and south to the Illawarra. It mainly inhabits rocky areas including boulders, rock faces or small rock crevices, but can also naturally be found on trees including in areas with no immediate rocky habitat. The species can occupy a wide range of niches from temperate rainforest gullies to drier sclerophyll ridge lines. It has also adapted well to human structures and can be found in garages, fences, retaining walls and homes.

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    in Sydney

    Diet

    Arthropods such as spiders, moths, beetles and cockroaches.[6]

    Reproduction

    One or two eggs per clutch, laid in a crevice.[6] Juveniles hatch after eight to ten weeks.

    Captivity

    Considered an "easy to keep" species,[7] a license is required to keep the Southern leaf-tailed gecko as a pet in Australia, though licenses may differ from state to state.

    References

    1. ^ "Phyllurus platurus (Shaw, 1790)" The Reptile Database
    2. ^ a b Cogger, Harold (1975). REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS OF AUSTRALIA. Sydney: A.H. & A.W. Reed. ISBN 9780589071769..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    3. ^ "Southern Leaf-tailed Gecko - Phyllurus platurus - Australian Museum". australianmuseum.net.au. Retrieved 2017-09-22.
    4. ^ Australia, Atlas of Living. "Phyllurus platurus : Southern Leaf-tailed Gecko | Atlas of Living Australia". bie.ala.org.au. Retrieved 2017-09-22.
    5. ^ "Phyllurus platurus". The Queensland Museum. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
    6. ^ a b c Doughty, Paul; Shine, Richard (1995). "Life in Two Dimensions: Natural History of the Southern Leaf-Tailed Gecko, Phyllurus platurus". Herpetologica. 51 (2): 193–201. doi:10.2307/3892587. JSTOR 3892587.
    7. ^ http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/wildlifelicences/ReptileLicensingOutline.htm
    • Wilson, Steve and Swan, Gerry (2003) A Complete Guide to Reptiles of Australia Reed New Holland, Frenchs Forest, New South Wales, page 88, ISBN 1-876334-72-X
    • Laube, A. and Langner, C. (2007) "Die "Geckos" Australiens" Draco 8(29): pp. 4–21; in German


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