Cymbopetalum mayanum

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Cymbopetalum mayanum is a species of plant in family Annonaceae. The specific epithet mayanum refers to the Mayan region in which it is indigenous, specifically the Atlantic lowlands of Guatemala and Honduras.[1] It grows as a tree. It is endangered due to habitat loss from agriculture.[1]

Common names for C. mayanum include Mayan cymbopetalum, huevo de toro, muk, anona de montaña, banana, chikinte, guanabano, guinellito, guineo, gunchuch, mata boni, mataboni, naguate, sufricaya, tulmax,[2] chikinte, and naguate[3]

Mayan cymbopetalum provides food for ants[3] and many species of birds, including:[4]

References

  1. ^ a b c Nelson, C. (1998). "Cymbopetalum mayanum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 1998: e.T30674A9564812. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.1998.RLTS.T30674A9564812.en. Retrieved 10 February 2020.
  2. ^ GBIF Secretariat (1 July 2013). "Cymbopetalum mayanum Lundell Species in GBIF Backbone Taxonomy". Global Biodiversity Information Facility. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 14 August 2015.
  3. ^ a b Murray, Nancy A. (6 December 1993). Revision of Cymbopetalum and Porcelia (Annonaceae). Systematic botany monographs. 40. Ann Arbor, Mich: American Society of Plant Taxonomists. ISBN 9780912861401. OCLC 29527548.
  4. ^ Foster, Mercedes S. (March 2007). "The potential of fruit trees to enhance converted habitats for migrating birds in southern Mexico". Bird Conservation International. 17 (1): 45–61. doi:10.1017/S0959270906000554.

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Cymbopetalum mayanum: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Cymbopetalum mayanum is a species of plant in family Annonaceae. The specific epithet mayanum refers to the Mayan region in which it is indigenous, specifically the Atlantic lowlands of Guatemala and Honduras. It grows as a tree. It is endangered due to habitat loss from agriculture.

Common names for C. mayanum include Mayan cymbopetalum, huevo de toro, muk, anona de montaña, banana, chikinte, guanabano, guinellito, guineo, gunchuch, mata boni, mataboni, naguate, sufricaya, tulmax, chikinte, and naguate

Mayan cymbopetalum provides food for ants and many species of birds, including:

Yellow-billed cacique (Amblycercus holosericeus) Orange-billed sparrow (Arremon aurantiirostris) Bright-rumped attila (Attila spadiceus) Pale-billed woodpecker (Campephilus guatemalensis) Black-faced grosbeak (Caryothraustes poliogaster) Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus) Brown jay (Cyanocorax morio) Chestnut-sided warbler (Dendroica pensylvanica) Grey catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) Red-throated ant tanager (Habia fuscicauda) Wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) Black-throated shrike-tanager (Lanio aurantius) White-collared manakin (Manacus candei) Golden-fronted woodpecker (Melanerpes aurifrons) Black-cheeked woodpecker (Melanerpes pucherani) Ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagineus) Lesson's motmot (Momotus lessonii) Great crested flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) Dusky-capped flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) Brown-crested flycatcher (Myiarchus tyrannulus) Sulphur-bellied flycatcher (Myiodynastes luteiventris) Social flycatcher (Myiozetetes similis) Kentucky warbler (Oporornis formosus) Grey-collared becard (Pachyramphus major) Rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) Red-capped manakin (Pipra mentalis) Scarlet tanager (Piranga olivacea) Summer tanager (Piranga rubra) Keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus) Crimson-collared tanager (Ramphocelus sanguinolentus) Rufous mourner (Rhytipterna holerythra) Black-headed saltator (Saltator atriceps) Buff-throated saltator (Saltator maximus) Thrush-like schiffornis (Schiffornis turdinus agg.) Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) Yellow-winged tanager (Thraupis abbas) Masked tityra (Tityra semifasciata) Tropical kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) Yellow-green vireo (Vireo flavoviridis) Red-eyed vireo (Vireo olivaceous)
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