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Brief Summary

    Korean salamander: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    The Korean salamander (Hynobius leechii) is the most common species of salamander on the Korean peninsula, and is also found in nearby provinces of China (Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang) and on Jeju Island. It typically lives on forested hills, and from time to time mass deaths occur in Korea when salamanders encounter man-made drainage structures. This has prompted Korean government officials to execute a series of mass evacuations in heavily salamandered areas.

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Comprehensive Description

    Description
    provided by AmphibiaWeb text

    The tail is shorter than snout-vent length. The coloration is blackish-brown above, dispersed with a greyish-brown pattern. Vomerine teeth in V-shape. Gular fold present. 11-13 costal grooves.

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    Korean salamander
    provided by wikipedia

    The Korean salamander (Hynobius leechii) is the most common species of salamander on the Korean peninsula, and is also found in nearby provinces of China (Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang) and on Jeju Island. It typically lives on forested hills, and from time to time mass deaths occur in Korea when salamanders encounter man-made drainage structures. This has prompted Korean government officials to execute a series of mass evacuations in heavily salamandered areas.

    Subspecies

    • Hynobius leechi quelpartensis

    See also

    References

    1. ^ Masafumi Matsui; Zhao Wenge (2004). "Hynobius leechii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 30 October 2012..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ "South Korean nun ends 100-day fast for salamander". Daily Times. 5 February 2005. Archived from the original on 18 February 2012. Retrieved 11 January 2012.

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Distribution

    Distribution and Habitat
    provided by AmphibiaWeb text

    These salamanders are found in northeast China in the following areas: Liaoning (Xiongyue), Jilin, and Heilongjiang.

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Life Expectancy

    Lifespan, longevity, and ageing
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    Maximum longevity: 7.1 years (captivity)
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    Hynobius_leechii_1

Trends

    Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
    provided by AmphibiaWeb text

    These salamanders breed in lentic pools in mountain areas. Each female deposits a pair of egg sacs underwater. Little information is available at this time, but during the non-breeding season, adults are thought to be active at night on land.

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Threats

    Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
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    It is believed that the populations have declined rapidly but there are few data available.

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    3886_trends_threats