dcsimg

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Scutiger persiciaus (Berk. & Curt.) Murrill, Bull. Torrey
Club 30: 431. 1903.
Polyporus p€rsici7ius B^T^, & Curt. Grevillea 1 : 37. 1872.
Pilei confluent ; pileus soft, slightly elastic, pulvinate, often oblique, very thick, somewhat depressed, 10-25 cm. broad, 1-2 cm. thick; surface fulvous -brown, becoming purple at times, short-tomentose ; margin lobed or undulate, very obtuse : context white, with black lines marking the seasons of growth in dried specimens, wateryspongy, reddish, dark-purple in the cuticle in fresh specimens, fading to pale-lavender ; tubes decurrent, white when fresh, brownish-black in dried specimens, 2-3 mm. long, mouths angular, 2 to a mm., edges thin, lacerate: spores not seen : stipe central, thick, conical, dark-purple, 5 cm. long, 4-8 cm. thick.
Type locality : South Carolina.
Habitat : At the base of trunks in pine woods.
Distribution : Known only from the type locality.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
William Alphonso MurrilI, Gertrude Simmons BurIingham, Leigh H Pennington, John Hendly Barnhart. 1907-1916. (AGARICALES); POLYPORACEAE-AGARICACEAE. North American flora. vol 9. New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
original
visit source
partner site
North American Flora

Laetiporus persicinus

provided by wikipedia EN

Laetiporus persicinus, commonly known as the white chicken mushroom, is an edible mushroom of the genus Laetiporus. It is closely related to the chicken mushroom, or Laetiporus sulphureus. Laetiporus persicinus has a salmon pink cap and white pores.[2] This mushroom grows on dead and living hardwood and softwood trees.[3] It was first described scientifically by Miles Berkeley and Moses Ashley Curtis in 1853 as Polyporus persicinus.[4] It has been collected in Africa, Australia, Asia, North America, and South America.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Laetiporus persicinus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Gilb. 1981". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 2011-09-13.
  2. ^ Bessette, Alan; Bessette, Arleen R.; Hopping, Michael W. (2018). A Field Guide to Mushrooms of the Carolinas. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 349. ISBN 9781469638539.
  3. ^ Russell, B. (2006). Field Guide to Wild Mushrooms of Pennsylvania and the Mid-Atlantic. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-271-02891-0.
  4. ^ Berkeley, M.J.; Curtis, M.A. (1853). "Centuries of North American fungi". Annals and Magazine of Natural History. 12 (2): 417–435. doi:10.1080/03745485709495068.
  5. ^ Ryvarden, L.; Johansen, I. (1980). A Preliminary Polypore Flora of East Africa. Synopsis Fungorum. Oslo, Norway: Fungiflora A/S. ISBN 978-0-945345-14-5.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Laetiporus persicinus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Laetiporus persicinus, commonly known as the white chicken mushroom, is an edible mushroom of the genus Laetiporus. It is closely related to the chicken mushroom, or Laetiporus sulphureus. Laetiporus persicinus has a salmon pink cap and white pores. This mushroom grows on dead and living hardwood and softwood trees. It was first described scientifically by Miles Berkeley and Moses Ashley Curtis in 1853 as Polyporus persicinus. It has been collected in Africa, Australia, Asia, North America, and South America.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN