dcsimg

Brief Summary

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis is a species of frog in the family Phrynobatrachidae. It is recorded in several places in southern and eastern Tanzania and in northern and southern Malawi (Ukinga and Rungwe mountains in the southern Tanzania and the Uluguru Mountains in the east; the Misuku Mountains and Nchenachena in northern Malawi, and Maroka in the highlands southwest of the Zomba Massif in southern Malawi); it probably occurs more widely, at least in areas in between the known localities. Common names Ukinga puddle frog and Ukinga river frog have been coined for it.

    license
    cc-by-sa-3.0
    copyright
    Wikipedia authors and editors
    original
    visit source
    partner site
    wikipedia
    ID
    d83ac2a5d93f2f50290d71623f8bf367

Comprehensive Description

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis
    provided by wikipedia

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis is a species of frog in the family Phrynobatrachidae.[1][3][4] It is recorded in several places in southern and eastern Tanzania and in northern and southern Malawi (Ukinga and Rungwe mountains in the southern Tanzania and the Uluguru Mountains in the east; the Misuku Mountains and Nchenachena in northern Malawi, and Maroka in the highlands southwest of the Zomba Massif in southern Malawi); it probably occurs more widely, at least in areas in between the known localities.[1] Common names Ukinga puddle frog and Ukinga river frog have been coined for it.[3][4]

    Description

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis is a small species; males grow to 19 mm (0.7 in) and females to 21 mm (0.8 in) in snout–vent length. The snout is moderate. The tympanum is hidden. The finger and toe tips are dilated into small but distinct discs. The toes have reduced webbing. The dorsum is mainly brown or olive and minutely mottled with dusky brown. A light vertebral line may be present, with similar lines on the thighs and tibiae. There is a continuous, light sub-tympanic band, extending from the lower eyelid to the base of the arm, typically bordered by an irregular dark band. The posterior parts of the venter are largely transparent. Females have dusky specklings or freckling on the throat; this may extend to the breast. Males have dusky to black throat and a cream-color patch across the belly at the midbody; when deflated, the vocal sac often forms a tranverse fold.[4]

    Habitat and conservation

    This species occurs in montane forests, forest edges, and open montane grasslands at elevations of 1,000–2,000 m (3,300–6,600 ft) above sea level, perhaps somewhat higher. It seems to be associated with marshy areas.[1][4] Males call hidden in the base of grasses near pools and other small water bodies; the eggs are laid in water and float on the surface.[4]

    Phrynobatrachus ukingensis is threatened by habitat loss caused by agricultural expansion, wood extraction, and expanding human settlements. It occurs in a number of protected areas, including the Kitulo National Park in southern Tanzania.[1]

    References

    1. ^ a b c d e IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group; South African Frog Re-assessment Group (SA-FRoG) (2017). "Phrynobatrachus ukingensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2017: e.T58146A77162114. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-2.RLTS.T58146A77162114.en. Retrieved 24 March 2018..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ Loveridge, Arthur (1932). "New reptiles and amphibians from Tanganyika Territory and Kenya Colony". Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. 72: 375–387.
    3. ^ a b c Frost, Darrel R. (2018). "Phrynobatrachus ukingensis (Loveridge, 1932)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 24 March 2018.
    4. ^ a b c d e Zimkus, Breda (2014). "Phrynobatrachus ukingensis (Loveridge, 1932)". African Amphibians. Retrieved 24 March 2018.
     title=
    license
    cc-by-sa-3.0
    copyright
    Wikipedia authors and editors
    original
    visit source
    partner site
    wikipedia
    ID
    ce0cccb6bb569b5dca241661ad1c56a8