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Procambarus (O.) pubescens

E Ankylocythere ancyla: Laurens (Hart and Hart, 1974:21)

Ankylocythere telmoecea: Burke (Hart and Hart, 1974:32)

Entocythere elliptica Burke, Screven (Hart and Hart, 1974:88)

Uncinocythere equicurva: Laurens (Hart and Hart, 1974:129)
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Hobbs, Horton Holcombe, Jr. 1981. "The Crayfishes of Georgia." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-549. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.318

Comprehensive Description

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Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens (Faxon)

Cambarus pubescens Faxon, 1884:109.

Cambarus (Cambarus) pubescens.—Ortmann, 1905c:101.

Cambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Fowler, 1912:341 [by implication].

Procambarus pubescens.—Hobbs, 1942a:342 [by implication]; 1947a:1, figs. 1, 6–8, 15 [not 14], 17, 22, 27, 28, 31.

Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Hobbs, 1972a:9; 1974b:60, fig. 223; 1981:408, figs. 13b, 137f, 138j, 161–163, 253.

Procambarus (Ortmanicus) pubescens.—Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson, 1976:59 [erroneous spelling].

TYPES.—Syntypes, USNM 3181 (male II, female), MCZ 3551 (2 female).

TYPE LOCALITY.—McBean Creek, south of Augusta, Burke-Richmond County line, Georgia.

RANGE.—The Oconee, Ogeechee, and Savannah river systems in eastern Georgia and South Carolina

HABITAT.—Streams.
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bibliographic citation
Hobbs, Horton Holcombe, Jr. 1989. "An Illustrated Checklist of the American Crayfishes (Decapoda, Astacidae, Cambaridae, Parastacidae)." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-236. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.480

Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens (Faxon)

Cambarus pubescens Faxon, 1884:109.

Cambarus (Cambarus) pubescens.—Ortmann, 1905c:101.

Cambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Fowler, 1912:341 [by implication].

Procambarus pubescens.—Hobbs, 1942a:342 [by implication]; 1947a:l, figs. 1, 6–8, 15, 17, 22, 27, 28, 31.

Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Hobbs, 1972a:9.

TYPES.—Syntypes, USNM 3181 (— II, ).

TYPES-LOCALITY.—McBean Creek, south of Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia.

RANGE.—In the Oconee, Ogeechee, and Savannah drainage systems in Georgia and South Carolina.

HABITAT.—Streams.
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bibliographic citation
Hobbs, Horton Holcombe, Jr. 1974. "A Checklist of the North and Middle American Crayfishes (Decapoda: Astacidae and Cambaridae)." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-161. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.166

Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens (Faxon)

Cambarus pubescens Faxon, 1884:109–110, 137; 1885a:17, 18, 31–33, 158, 167, 173, pl. I: fig. 3, pl. VIII: fig. 1a, 1a'; 1885b:358; 1898:646; 1914:412–413—Underwood, 1886:372.—Hay, 1899b:959, 963.—Ortmann, 1902:277.—Harris, 1903a:58, 121, 138, 143, 152.—Hobbs, 1940a:389, 398, 423; 1940b:7; 1942c:56, figs. 5, 6; 1962:274; 1972a:2.

Cambarus (Cambarus) pubescens.—Ortmann, 1905a:101, 128.

Cambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Fowler, 1912:341 [by implication].

Procambarus pubescens.—Hobbs, 1942a:350; 1942b:122, 129, 130, 133, 142; 1947a:1–5, 8, 12, 14, figs. 1, 6–8, [not 14] 15, 17, 22, 27, 28, 31; 1947b:29; 1952a:212; 1958a:72, 76, 79, 84–86, 90, fig. 6; 1958b:160, 163, 164; 1959:889; 1962:273, 284, fig. 29; 1966b:70; 1968b:K–10, fig. 25d.—Hoff, 1944:349, 356.—Anonymous, 1972c:27, 28, 30, 31, 33; 1975a:156.—Hart and Hart, 1974:21, 32, 88, 129.—Duke et al., 1978:40.—Wharton, 1978:220.

Procambarus pubscens.—Hobbs III, 1969:41 [erroneous spelling].

Procambarus (Ortmannicus) pubescens.—Hobbs, 1972a:9; 1972b:64, 151, 154, 155, fig. 50c; 1974b:60, fig. 223.—Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson, 1976:3, 12, 37–39, figs. 16, 24.

Procambarus (Ortmanicus) pubescens.—Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson, 1976:59 [erroneous spelling].

These citations are believed to constitute a complete bibliography of the species, and all except Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson (1976) deal primarily with the occurrence of the species in Georgia or with specimens from the state. Only one record of the presence of P. (O.) pubescens in South Carolina (Hobbs, 1972b:151; no locality cited) was known prior to the work of Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson.

SUMMARY OF LITERATURE.—Faxon (1884) described this crayfish on the basis of a second form male and a female collected in McBean Creek (south of Augusta), which serves as a boundary between Burke and Richmond counties, Georgia, and two additional females were reported from the latter county. In 1898, he recorded its occurrence in Buckhead Creek at Millen, which is now in Jenkins County (Hobbs, 1947a:4). Publications between 1898 and 1940 introduced no new information, although two new combinations were proposed for the name of the animal (Ortmann, 1905a, and Fowler, 1912). Hobbs (1940a) pointed out its affinities with P. (O.) pictus and several of the Floridian troglobitic species, and, in a second publication (1940b), its relationship to P. (O.) lunzi. Hoff (1944) cited this crayfish as a host of two new entocytherids described by him from Georgia, but no specific localities were mentioned. Although Hoff's specimens were collected by me, I am unable to determine from which localities they came. In 1947(a), Hobbs provided a diagnosis of the species, described the previously unknown first form male, and listed several localities in Bryan, Burke, McDuffie, Screven, and Wilkes counties. His discussion of the evolution of the pictus Group of the genus Procambarus (1958a) included morphological comparisons of P. (O.) pubescens with its relatives, a spot map delineating its range in the Oconee, Ogeechee, and Savannah drainage systems, and a discussion of its affinities. The names of the four undescribed species treated in that study are as follows: P. sp. A and P. sp. C are Procambarus (O.) chacei (= P. (O.) enoplosternum) and P. (O.) epicyrtus, respectively (Hobbs, 1958c); and P. sp. B and P. sp. D are P. (O.) hirsutus and P. (O.) ancylus, respectively (Hobbs, 1958b). Keys, discussions of relationships, and a few illustrations were included in Hobbs (1959, 1962). No specific localities other than those of Faxon (1884, 1898) and Hobbs (1947a) were cited in the literature until Anonymous (1972c) reported the occurrence of P. (O.) pubescens at five stations within the Brier Creek basin in Burke, Jefferson, and McDuffie counties. Three additional ones were added by Hart and Hart (1974) in Burke County and one in Laurens. The most complete accounts of the species are those of Hobbs (1947a) and Hobbs III, Thorp, and Anderson (1976). The latter noted its presence in several localities in the Savannah Basin sections of Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina, provided a diagnosis of the species, presented color and ecological notes, and summarized the life history data presented earlier by Hobbs (1947a). Duke et al. (1978) presented a brief account of the effects of cadmium on adenylate energy charge in this crayfish. The publications not mentioned in this brief discussion contain no original data.

DIAGNOSIS.—Rostrum with marginal spines, lacking median carina; acumen often obscured by pubescence on apical part of rostrum. Carapace with 1 pair of cervical spines. Areola 2.1 to 3.7 (average 2.9) times as long as broad and constituting 25.1 to 30.4 (average 27.5) percent of entire length of carapace (36.2 to 42.4, average 38.6, percent of postorbital carapace length). Antennal peduncle with prominent spine on ischium. Lateral half of ventral surface of ischium of third maxilliped lacking conspicuous mat of long plumose setae. Basis of cheliped without mesial spine. Mesial surface of palm of chela of male with mesialmost row of tubercles consisting of 7 to 11 (usually 8 or 9). Male with simple hooks on ischia of third and fourth pereiopods, in first form male that on third overreaching basioischial articulation and that on fourth not reaching articulation but opposed by prominent protuberance on cephalodistal end of corresponding basis. First pleopods asymmetrical and reaching coxae of third pereiopods, distal fourth of shaft rather strongly inclined caudodistally and bearing prominent hump, distal extremity of latter situated at base of cephalic process; subapical setae flanking mesial, cephalic, and lateral sides of distal part of appendage and largely obscuring cephalic process and central projection; mesial process subspiculiform and directed caudodistally; cephalic process, usually far overreaching other terminal elements and quite far removed from central projection, slender, straight, and tapering to acute tip directed subdistally; corneous central projection rather short, compressed, subtriangular, and directed caudodistally and somewhat mesially; caudal element consisting of (1) prominent, but not strongly inflated, caudal knob, forming transverse rounded ridge across caudodistal end of shaft of appendage and infrequently sharply delimited caudolaterally, (2) caudal process consisting of small (occasionally vestigial or absent), corneous, obliquely set, triangular tooth situation at caudomesial base of central projection, and (3) low, corneous, ridgelike adventitious process (sometimes imperceptibly continuous with mesial part of caudal knob) extending along mesial side of caudal process. Female with sternum cephalic to annulus marked with median cleft often flanked by short, broadly rounded prominences jutting toward annulus and occasionally slightly overreaching its cephalic border; annulus ventralis almost always subovate, with greatest width in transverse axis, ventral surface usually moderately strongly sculptured with broad submedian longitudinal trough anteriorly flanked by low subparallel ridges, and with elevated posteromedian area; sigmoid sinus originating in trough and ending on posteromedian elevation anterior to caudal margin; postannular sclerite at least three-fourths as wide as annulus and arched ventrally; first pleopod present.

COLOR NOTES (Figure 137f).—As in many of the Georgia crayfishes, two color phases exist: one consisting predominately of shades of blue, gray, and black and the other of brown, tan, orange, and black. The latter is described here. Carapace basically reticulate chocolate brown over orange tan, with conspicuous charcoal gray to black markings. Cephalic section of carapace with median longitudinal orange tan stripe extending from acumen to cervical groove flanked caudally by pair of almost black spots on mesial parts of mandibular adductor regions; antennal and mandibular, and sometimes hepatic, regions with small cream spot. Thoracic section with median longitudinal pale stripe less well defined than in cephalic section, but reaching caudal ridge, thus interrupting transverse bar of broad black saddle; horns of saddle deeply incised laterally near midlength; narrow light area subtending transverse bar anteriorly and continuing along dorsal margins of horns to level of incision; remainder of dorsal area with reticulate pattern matching that of cephalic section; caudal ridge and flange dark grayish blue and branchiostegites ventral to horn dark gray to brown, with cream to orange cream spots. Abdominal terga reddish brown on anterior two-thirds and grayish tan posteriorly, but first through fifth margined in black; lateral area of second through sixth with dark reddish brown spot; pleura of each segment with pink to red spot, flanked anteriorly and posteriorly by reddish brown covering most of each pleuron. Telson with reddish brown arc basally and broad, paired almost black areas on lateral fourth of cephalic section; caudal section and most of uropods brownish red; mesial ramus of uropod with blackish area proximally, fading along lateral margin; mesial blackish part set off sharply from reddish distal area by short translucent line; lateral ramus of uropod with blackish suffusion proximomesially and black edge along suture dividing proximal and distal sections. Antennular and antennal peduncles orange tan, mottled in charcoal; flagella olive tan; antennal scale also orange tan, with mottled charcoal lateral margin and charcoal suffusion along mesial side of thickened lateral part. Cheliped orange tan with black tubercles; major tubercles on merus and carpus with white to cream tips; fingertips only slightly paler than dark orange tan fingers. Remaining pereiopods pale olive to cream proximally and olive distal to ischium. Ventral surface of body pinkish cream.

TYPES.—Syntypes, USNM 3181 (II, ).

TYPE-LOCALITY.—McBean Creek, south of Augusta, Burke-Richmond county line, Georgia.

RANGE.—The Oconee, Ohoopee, Ogeechee, and Savannah river basins in Georgia and the latter basin in South Carolina. In the Savannah and Ogeechee watersheds, it invades the lower Piedmont Province; elsewhere it is confined to the Coastal Plain Province, frequenting streams in the Fall Line Hills and Vidalia Upland districts. An outlying population occurs in Black Creek, a tributary of the Ogeechee River in Bryan County (Barrier Island Sequence District).

GEORGIA SPECIMENS EXAMINED.—I have examined 601 specimens from the following counties (the numbers of localities in each are noted in parentheses): Baldwin (1), Bryan (1), Burke (22), Emanuel (1), Glascock (5), Gwinnett (?, see “Variations”), Hancock (1), Jefferson (4), Jenkins (3), Laurens (1), McDuffie (3), Oglethorpe (1), Richmond (6), Screven (2), Taliaferro (4), Warren (3), Washington (4), Wilkes (4), and Wilkinson (1). Data follow for those counties in which fewer than five localities are known. Baldwin County: (1) 0.3 mi N of Wilkinson Co line, 4, 22 Mar 1961, P. C. Holt, V. F. Holt, collectors. Bryan County: (2) Black Creek 3.7 mi SW of Blitchton on US Hwy 280 (Hobbs, 1947b:4), 1I, 4II, 8f;, 2j, 18 Dec 1939, G. B. Hobbs, HHH. Emanuel County: (3) stream from McKinney's Pond 7 mi SSW of Midville, 4, 4 Sep 1954, J. W. Crenshaw, W. Auffenberg; 2, 1954, Humphries. Hancock County: (4) Beaver Dam Creek 1.7 mi S of Powelton on St Rte 22, 1II, 1, 2j, 4 Oct 1977, T. A. English, Jr., HHH. Jefferson County: (5) Brushy Creek at St Rte 80, about 2 mi SE of Stellaville, 2, 2j, 5j, 29 Sep 1970, B. A. Caldwell, M. W. Walker; 2, 2j, 6j, 2 Oct 1972, GBH, HHH; (6) Brush Creek 0.4 mi S of Wrens on US Hwy 1, 2f;, 18 Sep 1947, E. A. Lachner, P. S. Handwerk; (7) Nails Creek at US Hwy 319, 3.7 mi N of Johnson Co line, 2I, 1II, 3, 1j, 16 Jun 1972, D. J. Peters, J. E. Pugh, HHH; (8) Salter Branch 1.4 mi W of Bartow on St Rte 242, 1II, 1, 16 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH. Jenkins County: (9) Buckhead Creek at Millen, 1II, 3, date ?, US Fish Commission; (10) Magnolia Springs below dam, 1I, 14 Feb 1948, Shaum and Grant; 15II, 14, 6j, 22j, 1 Feb 1952, D. C. Scott; (11) Chew Mill Creek 3.2 mi E of Burke Co Line on St Rte 17, 1j, 2j, 2 Oct 1972, GBH, HHH. Laurens County: (12) Rocky Creek 1.9 mi N of Bleckley Co line on St Rte 26 (Hart and Hart, 1974:21, 129), 2I, 4II, 1, 1 with young, 18 Aug 1952, GBH, HHH; 4I, 2II, 4, 1j, 7j, 21 Apr 1966, E. T. Hall, Jr., HHH; 1II, 6, 2j, 1j, 20 Jun 1975, DJP, JEP, HHH. McDuffie County: (13) trib to Sweetwater Creek 3.5 mi SE of Thomson on US Hwy 78 (Hobbs, 1947b:4), 2II, 1, 21 Jun 1940, GBH, HHH; (14) Little River, 1I, 2, 22 Jul 1948, D. C. Scott; (15) Brier Creek at St Rte 17, 2II, 2, 2j, 9j, 29 Sep 1970, BAC, MWW. Oglethorpe County: (16) trib to Long Creek 2.6 mi SE of Lexington, 1, 3j, 1j, 10 Oct 1953, R. D. Suttkus. Screven County: (17) Beaver Dam Creek 5 (not 3 as cited by Hobbs, 1947b:4) mi N of Sylvania on US Hwy 301, 1I, 6II, 4, 7j, 7 Sep 1938, GBH, HHH; 1, 1j, 14 Sep 1951, DCS; 4II, 6, 1j, 2j, 15 Sep 1955, RDS; 1I, 3II, 12, 1j, 2 ovig , 17 Apr 1977, C. E. Carter, C. W. Hart, Jr., JEP, HHH; (18) Blue Spring near Sylvania, 1II, 5, 2j, 10 Aug 1951, DCS. Taliaferro County: (19) White Creek at St Rte 44, 1.8 mi NE of Green Co line, 1II, 3, 14 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH; (20) North Fork of Ogeechee River 3.6 mi E of Greene Co line on US Hwy 278 and 1.5 mi SW on Co Rd, 1I, 1II, 1, 14 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH; (21) South Fork of Little River at St Rte 22, 3II, 4, 1j, 5j, 1 Oct 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH; 4j, 4 Oct 1977, TAE, HHH; 2II, 4, 3 Apr 1978, R. J. Dubois, DJP, JEP, HHH; (22) South Fork of Ogeechee River at St Rte 22, 2, 3 Apr 1978, RJD, DJP, JEP, HHH. Warren County: (23) trib to Hart Creek 6.8 mi N of Camak on St Rte 80, 2I, 1II, 4, 1j, 27 Apr 1966, ETH, HHH; (24) trib to Goldens Creek 1.4 mi S of Warrenton on St Rte 80, 2I, 15 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH; (25) Reedy Creek 0.4 mi N of Jefferson Co line on St Rte 17, 1, 2j, 1j, 2 Oct 1972, GBH, HHH. Washington County: (26) Williamson Swamp Creek 1 mi N of Warthen, 1I, 6, 2j, 3j, 1 ovig , 27 Apr 1966, ETH, HHH; (27) Hill Creek 5 mi E of Sandersville on St Rte 24, 3II, 1, 1j, 1j, 21 Jul 1971, BAC, MWW; (28) Williamson Swamp Creek 4.1 mi W of Jefferson Co line on St Rte 88, 2, 15 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH; (29) Cedar Creek 0.8 mi E of St Rte 15 on Rte 231, 1, 16 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH. Wilkes County: (30) Beaver Dam Creek 13 mi W of Washington on US Hwy 78 (Hobbs, 1947b:4), 1II, 6 Sep 1938, GBH, HHH; (31) Clark Creek 5.2 mi W of Tignall on Co Rd, 1II, 3j, 5j, 3 Oct 1972, GBH, HHH; (32) Clark Creek about 8.5 airmi NW of Washington, 2j, 4j, 3 Oct 1972, GBH, HHH; (33) Middle Fork of Fishing Creek 9 mi S of Lincoln Co line on St Rte 44, 2I, 1, 14 Jun 1972, DJP, JEP, HHH. Wilkinson County: (34) swampy creek 1.8 mi S of Baldwin Co line, 1, 1j, 22 Mar 1961, PCH.

VARIATIONS.—Among the more conspicuous variations of this crayfish is the shape of the rostrum. Usually it is subplane toward the apex and densely studded with anteriorly directed setae that obscure the acumen, but occasional individuals have been observed in which the pubescence is exceedingly limited. The rostral margins may be subparallel or gently convergent to the base of the acumen. Usually the cervical and postorbital spines are very well developed, but occasionally they are small. The usual differences occur in the number of spines and tubercles on the various podomeres of the cheliped but are not noteworthy. In contrast, whereas the opposable margins of the fingers of the chelae of the females are tuberculate and bear a single row of minute denticles, in the first form male a broad band of denticles largely obscures the comparatively small tubercles that are so clearly evident in the female. The caudal element of the first pleopod (Figure 163) of the first form male varies even in a single population: the caudal knob may be rather strongly sclerotized, bulge caudolaterally, and be set off from the other terminal elements by a well-defined transverse excavation; in some specimens, however, it is weakly sclerotized, bears no conspicuous bulge, and the limiting excavation flanking it caudally may be obsolete. The caudal process is small but well developed in specimens from much of the range; however, in those males from Glascock, Laurens, and Taliaferro counties (Upper Ogeechee and Oconee basins) it is much reduced or virtually obsolete. The adventitious process, like the caudal knob, is sometimes sharply defined, but at least ocasionally it is low and not distinctly set off from the caudal knob. The annulus ventralis is highly variable, more so in surface contour than in outline. In some individuals the ridges and elevations are much depressed: the anterolateral ridges flanking the median trough may be hardly recognizable, and the posteromedian elevation may be depressed to a degree that the posterior part of the annulus is almost flat, interrupted only by the sinuous sinus. The sternum immediately anterior to the annulus may or may not exhibit a distinct cleft flanked by slightly protruding prominences; such are conspicuously absent in the females from Glascock and Jefferson counties, and in these specimens not even the cleft is evident.

A female from 5.5 miles west of Loganville on U.S. Highway 78, Gwinnett County, is tentatively assigned to this species. In addition to the paucity of setae on the rostrum, the absence of a cervical spine, and the presence of small tubercles on the sternum immediately anterior to the annulus ventralis, the specimen was collected in a tributary to the Ocmulgee River, a basin from which no other member of the species has been found. I have attempted to obtain additional specimens in this locality, as well as in other nearby streams, but the only crayfishes encountered were members of Cambarus (D.) latimanus and P. (Pe.) spiculifer. Because I have been unable to confirm the presence of Procambarus (O.) pubescens in this locality, the latter is not included on Figure 162, nor is the single specimen listed among the “Georgia Specimens Examined.”

SIZE.—The largest specimen available is a female, possessing a carapace length of 41.0 (postorbital carapace length 30.5) mm. Corresponding lengths of the smallest and largest first form males are 23.2 (16.3) mm and 36.4 (26.1) mm, and of the smallest ovigerous female, 25.5 (17.6) mm.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
Hobbs, Horton Holcombe, Jr. 1981. "The Crayfishes of Georgia." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-549. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.318