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Brief Summary

    Blue grosbeak: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    The blue grosbeak (Passerina caerulea), is a medium-sized seed-eating bird in the same family as the northern cardinal, "tropical" or New World buntings, and "cardinal-grosbeaks" or New World grosbeaks.

    The male blue grosbeak is almost entirely deep blue. The female is mostly brown. Both sexes are distinguished by their large, deep bill and double wing bars. These features, as well as the grosbeak's relatively larger size, distinguish this species from the indigo bunting. Length can range from 14 to 19 cm (5.5 to 7.5 in) and wingspan is from 26 to 29 cm (10 to 11 in). Body mass is typically from 26 to 31.5 g (0.92 to 1.11 oz).

    This is a migratory bird, with nesting grounds across most of the southern half of the United States and much of northern Mexico, migrating south to Central America and in very small numbers to northern South America; the southernmost record comes from eastern Ecuador. It eats mostly insects, but it will also eat snails, spiders, seeds, grains, and wild fruits. The blue grosbeak forages on the ground and in shrubs and trees.

    Passerina caerulea
    provided by DC Birds Brief Summaries

    A large (6-7 ½ inches) bunting, the male Blue Grosbeak is most easily identified by its dark blue body, chestnut and tan wing stripes, and large conical bill. The female Blue Grosbeak is brown overall with dark wings and orange wing bars. This species is most easily distinguished from the related Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) by the latter species’ smaller size and paler plumage in both sexes. The Blue Grosbeak breeds across the southern half of the United States and northern Mexico. In winter, these populations migrate south to southern Mexico and the east coast of Central America. Blue Grosbeaks are present all year in the highlands of central Mexico and the west coast of Central America. Blue Grosbeaks breed in and around shrubby edges of deciduous and evergreen woodland. During the winter, this species may be found in overgrown fields and clearings in humid tropical forests. Blue Grosbeaks primarily eat insects and seeds. In appropriate habitat, Blue Grosbeaks may be seen foraging for food in shrubs and low tree branches. Birdwatchers may also listen for this species’ song, a series of warbled notes recalling that of a finch. Blue Grosbeaks are primarily active during the day.

    Threat Status: Least Concern

    Passerina caerulea
    provided by EOL authors

    A large (6-7 ½ inches) bunting, the male Blue Grosbeak is most easily identified by its dark blue body, chestnut and tan wing stripes, and large conical bill. The female Blue Grosbeak is brown overall with dark wings and orange wing bars. This species is most easily distinguished from the related Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) by the latter species’ smaller size and paler plumage in both sexes. The Blue Grosbeak breeds across the southern half of the United States and northern Mexico. In winter, these populations migrate south to southern Mexico and the east coast of Central America. Blue Grosbeaks are present all year in the highlands of central Mexico and the west coast of Central America. Blue Grosbeaks breed in and around shrubby edges of deciduous and evergreen woodland. During the winter, this species may be found in overgrown fields and clearings in humid tropical forests. Blue Grosbeaks primarily eat insects and seeds. In appropriate habitat, Blue Grosbeaks may be seen foraging for food in shrubs and low tree branches. Birdwatchers may also listen for this species’ song, a series of warbled notes recalling that of a finch. Blue Grosbeaks are primarily active during the day.

Comprehensive Description

    Blue grosbeak
    provided by wikipedia

    The blue grosbeak (Passerina caerulea),[2] is a medium-sized seed-eating bird in the same family as the northern cardinal, "tropical" or New World buntings, and "cardinal-grosbeaks" or New World grosbeaks.

    The male blue grosbeak is almost entirely deep blue. The female is mostly brown. Both sexes are distinguished by their large, deep bill and double wing bars. These features, as well as the grosbeak's relatively larger size, distinguish this species from the indigo bunting. Length can range from 14 to 19 cm (5.5 to 7.5 in) and wingspan is from 26 to 29 cm (10 to 11 in).[3][4] Body mass is typically from 26 to 31.5 g (0.92 to 1.11 oz).[5]

    This is a migratory bird, with nesting grounds across most of the southern half of the United States and much of northern Mexico, migrating south to Central America and in very small numbers to northern South America; the southernmost record comes from eastern Ecuador. It eats mostly insects, but it will also eat snails, spiders, seeds, grains, and wild fruits. The blue grosbeak forages on the ground and in shrubs and trees.

    Habitat

    This species is found in partly open habitat with scattered trees, riparian woodland, scrub, thickets, cultivated lands, woodland edges, overgrown fields, or hedgerows. It nests in a low tree or bush or a tangle of vegetation, usually about 1–3 m (3.3–9.8 ft) above ground, often at the edge of an open area.

    • Gallery
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      Adult female blue grosbeak

    • Adult male

      Adult male

    • Blue Grosbeak in Birds of America

      Blue Grosbeak in Birds of America

    References

    1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Passerina caerulea". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    2. ^ "Evolution of a Citation by Richard C. Banks - USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center". pwrc.usgs.gov.
    3. ^ "Blue Grosbeak".
    4. ^ "eNature: FieldGuides: Species Detail". Archived from the original on 2012-02-22.
    5. ^ CRC Handbook of Avian Body Masses by John B. Dunning Jr. (Editor). CRC Press (1992), ISBN 978-0849342585.

Life Expectancy

    Lifespan, longevity, and ageing
    provided by AnAge articles
    Maximum longevity: 10.2 years (wild)