dcsimg

Brief Summary

Comprehensive Description

Distribution

    Distribution and Habitat
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    This species is endemic to Cuba. It is known only in Eastern Cuba, from an approximate elevation of 300 m to 1200 m, although it has been heard calling at elevations as low as 60 m (Hedges et al. 1992). This frog is a representative in Cuba of the bromeliad ecomorph (species that live almost exclusively in bromeliads), and it is found in rainforests, pinewoods, disturbed vegetation and on coffee plantations.

Trends

    Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
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    During the day specimens take refuge in arboreal bromeliads, although they can be found under tree bark or sporadically in leaf litter. At night, males vocalize from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs (at least 1 m from the ground) and from bromeliads high in trees (more than 2 m above the ground). Calls are series of hollow and slightly metallic “tocks” (2-10 notes), with the dominant frequency between 2.4-2.7 kHz. This frog is a direct-developing species. Clutches are deposited within the bases of bromeliad leaves (many times in Tillandsia sp.) at 0.6-3 m above the ground. The clutch size is 8-13 eggs, with large eggs ranging from 3 to 6 mm in diameter. The maximum period of incubation under artificial conditions is 20 days. This species exhibits male parental care of the clutch (Estrada 1990, Hedges et al. 1992, Townsend 1996, Fong, unpublished).

Threats

    Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
    provided by AmphibiaWeb text

    Some natural areas in Eastern Cuba have been degraded and substituted by pastures, inducing the extinction of this species in its original habitat. Nevertheless, it is able to survive in areas where coffee plantations have substituted natural vegetation (Fong 1999).

    Habitat modification is considered the principal threat to this species (Vale et al. 1998).