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Manfreda sileri Verh.-Will.

Brief Summary

    Manfreda sileri: Brief Summary
    provided by wikipedia

    Manfreda sileri is a species known only from coastal areas in the States of Texas and Tamaulipas. It grows on open locations with clay soil, at elevations below 100 m (330 feet). Siler's tuberose is a common name.

    Manfreda sileri is a perennial herb spreading by means of globose underground rhizomes. It produces rosettes of waxy, light green leaves mottled with dark green or brown spots. The flowering stalk can reach a height of up to 220 cm (7.2 feet), with as many as 80 greenish-yellow flowers bearing large yellow anthers.

Comprehensive Description

    Manfreda sileri
    provided by wikipedia

    Manfreda sileri is a species known only from coastal areas in the States of Texas and Tamaulipas. It grows on open locations with clay soil, at elevations below 100 m (330 feet).[3] Siler's tuberose is a common name.[4]

    Manfreda sileri is a perennial herb spreading by means of globose underground rhizomes. It produces rosettes of waxy, light green leaves mottled with dark green or brown spots. The flowering stalk can reach a height of up to 220 cm (7.2 feet), with as many as 80 greenish-yellow flowers bearing large yellow anthers.[3][5][6][7]

    References

    1. ^ Tropicos
    2. ^ The Plant List
    3. ^ a b Flora of North America v 26 p 464
    4. ^ "Manfreda sileri". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 29 June 2015..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
    5. ^ Verhoek-Williams, Susan Elizabeth. Brittonia 30(2): 168–170, f. 4–6. 1978.
    6. ^ Thiede, Joachim, & Urs Eggli. Kakteen und Andere Sukkulenten 50: 111. 1999.
    7. ^ Plant Delights Nursery, Juniper Level Botanic Gardens
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