Erwin Gruber

Enthusiast for living creatures

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Thelypteris quelpaertensis (Christ) Ching":

    @Katja Schulz: All right, i got the reason. " Do you think T. quelpaertensis and O. limbosperma should have separate EOL pages?" A simple question, as usual with taxonomy not that simple to find "right" answers ;-) Dear Katja, the cited ITIS report of T. quelpaertensis is right so far, as it seems you missed the additions to listed taxa saying "auct. NON". In other words several unnamed authors mixed up Thelypteris (Oreopteris) quelpaertensis with the mainly European T. / O. limbosperma. Currently there are 2 accepted species, which are likely to be separated from Thelypteris and sorted to Oreopteris by most colleagues. BUT things are even more complicated, (sub-)specific borders of all populations do not appear to have been propperly investigated and cleared. In other words, there could be a single species with disjunct populations, possibly parted into 2-3 (4?) subspecies, or all populations might be valued as distinct species. Thus i may not answer your question at last, can not know if the Asian quelpaertensis and European limbosperma will turn out as distinct species. Maybe there is a chance to clear up systematic relations, there are some people at inaturlist.org, so i could start a project to gather data and samplings. I will ask George Yatskievych and do guess he knows colleagues who liked to do some gene sequencing and analyzing. At the moment i would not do further taxonomic changes here. Best regards Erwin

    21 days ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Thelypteris quelpaertensis (Christ) Ching":

    @Katja Schulz: Dear Katja, in case i got it right, your moving of T. quelpaertensis to O. limbosperma will follow your conclusion that both were truly synonyms, or am i wrong? Several aspects do seem to be uncleared yet, at least in my mind, still i did not search a lot. 1st.: Is T. / O. quelpaertensis, meaning the E Asian population in especial the one of Jejudo, Jeju Island a TRULY distinct species, or better to be treated conspecific to T. / O. limbosperma ? 2nd: Where do populations of W North America plus Newfoundland do belong to, are these more close related to European or Asian populations? 3rd: Should all together represent a single species, possibly parted into subspecies, or are American ones a third distinct species? Maybe you do know about more recent insights, otherwise we might try to compare all populations ourselves. Cheers Erwin

    24 days ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Cyttaria darwinii:

    Leaves and twigs of host to be seen at source.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Cyttaria darwinii on tall deciduous beech:

    Leaves and twigs to be seen at source.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of Polystichum setiferum":

    Just one of many cultivars, Polystichum setiferum cv. "Aarestrup", deviating from usual wild individuals.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of Polystichum setiferum":

    Just one of many cultivars, Polystichum setiferum cv. "Aarestrup", deviating from usual wild individuals.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of Polystichum setiferum var. pleuridensum":

    Just a cultivar of Polystichum setiferum, no published taxonomic variety, might be termed P. setiferum cv. "Pleuridensum" for the case the cultivars name is right.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of Polystichum setiferum var. pleuridensum":

    Just a cultivar of Polystichum setiferum, no published taxonomic variety, might be termed P. setiferum cv. "Pleuridensum" for the case the cultivars name is right.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of Polystichum setiferum var. pleuridensum":

    Just a cultivar of Polystichum setiferum, no published taxonomic variety, might be termed P. setiferum cv. "Pleuridensum" for the case the cultivars name is right.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.02:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.05:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.10:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.07:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.04:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago • edited: over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Titaeospora equiseti on Equisetum hyemale no.08:

    This is very probably the asexual propagating stage = anamorph of Stamnaria americana, rather unlikely of S. laetissima (Cesati) ined.!, but not of another S. sp. !

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Stamnaria:

    Got no example of "Dict. of the Fungi" at hand, as remembering the authors do refer the 2 true S. persoonii + americana to the genus, plus another which in fact is not congeneric, do not remember at moment, but do guess either "S. thujae or hyalopus", found not on Equisetum. Since several true Stamnaria spp. detected and described by me in master-thesis are not published yet, the genus does comprise some more 3 spp.

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine (Equisetaceae) - whole plant - unspecified:

    This looks much like Equisetum laevigatum

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Image of Equisetum laevigatum:

    This is typical for Equisetum hyemale

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on an older version of Image of Equisetum laevigatum:

    Equisetum laevigatum is looking much similar to E. hyemale, thus is nearby impossible to identify by images. The arrangement of silica-tuberles at shoot-surface is best feature to separate these spp. They are arranged in +- irregular rows transversely to shoot-axis or to some angle, more rounded and sometimes confluent in rows at E. laevigatum (as in E. ramosissimum). E. hyemale got silica tuberles quite strict in 2 rows along the ridges (ex my memory). If i do remember right, E. laevigatum does lose its sheat-teeth readily, whereas E. hyemale ssp. affine tends to keep them. Colour of shoots for usual is different, more light green to somewhat yellowish in E. laevigatum, and dark green in E. hyemale, whose shoots may grow thicker and higher, but this feature is very variable, depending on clones and habitats (own experience).

    over 3 years ago

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    Erwin Gruber commented on "Image of an unknown taxon":

    It is not possible to determine the species by the image, it may be either Equisetum laevigatum or E. hyemale subsp. affine. See my annotations to species-characterisation.

    over 3 years ago