Thomas Karrer

Entomologist

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Sympetrum":

    I am wondering according to what criteria Linnaeus named the genus Sympetrum. It goes back to the 10th edition of the Systema Naturae. Is there a clue to be found in the Greek root and prefix, like "to be on rocks"? Or would that be a far of the track reasoning? Concerning this inquiry the British Dragonfly Society was very helpful (thanks to Claire Install and Dave ........) and gave me some interessting background information. Actually its all getting rather complicated. Here the quotation of one part of the mail: Odonata - http://www.listbot.com/cgi-bin/subscriber On 3 Mar 99, at 14:34, Rudolf Vos wrote: > Another fact I remember from my lessons. The part of the word that should be > emphasised is the third from the right (how should I say that in proper > English?). So, it will be > Les'tes > Cordilu'gaster > Somato'chlora (although almost everyone says Somatochlo'ra in The Netherlands) > Sym'petrum (although almost everyone says Sympe'trum in The Netherlands) > etc. Ah, but Donald Borror has rules to deal with this! The emphasis is on the antepenultimate syllable _unless_: a) The word contains only two syllables b) The penultimate syllable contains a diphthong (e.g. Nymph-ae'-a) c) The vowel in the penult is followed by 'x' or 'z' (e.g. Co-rix'-a) d) The vowel in the penult is long, which may depend on the derivation of the word and the vowel pronunciation in the language of derivation; whence follows a long list of situations in which the vowel should be long. e) The vowel in the penult is short and followed by two consonants, except a mute followed by 'l' or 'r' (e.g. Cor-e-op'-sis, but Ge-om'-et-ra) Somatochlora would be pronounced with the emphasis on the penult, because the 'o' in 'chlora' is considered (by Borror, at least) to be long (rule d). Corduligaster would be pronounced with the emphasis on the penult, because of the 'st' combination (rule e). Sympetrum is a tougher problem. Is the 'e' long or short? That depends on the derivation of the word (rule d). Some say it is from the Greek "sym - petrum," meaning "same stone" (I think this is from Needham, though I can't find the reference at the moment). Jaeger, in _A Source-book of Biological Names and Terms_, says it is derived from the Greek "symp- etrum," meaning "squeezed-together [constricted? flattened?] abdomen." Jaeger indicates that the 'e' in 'etron' should be long; hence, "symp-e'-trum" (long 'e') would be correct (rule d). However, in _An Introduction to the Study of Insects_, Borror gives the pronunciation "sym-pet'-rum (short 'e', but accent on the penult), presumably based on Needham's derivation ("same stone"), though this seems to violate his rule e above, which suggests it should be pronounced "sym'-pe-trum" As to Libellula, he gives the pronunciation "li-bel'-lu-la" because a 'u' in the penult is long _except_ when followed by an 'l'. Hence, the 'u' in Libellula is short ("li-bel'-yuh-la" not "li-bel-you'-la"). However, Ischnura is "isch-nyou'- ra." Here's another hot pronunciation question for discussion. Borror indicates in his pronunciation guides that words derived from Latin ending in -ata, - atus, or -atum have a long 'a'; hence, the accent would be on the penult (example: "ma-cu-la'-ta" with a long 'a' in the penult). However, the penultimate 'a' is short in Greek plurals (e.g. "e-chi-no-der'-ma-ta"). So, if Odonata is from the Greek for "tooth," how come it isn't pronounced "o-don'- a-ta"? Terry Morse tmorse@teleport.com * A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. -- Emerson End of the quotation. Its quite amazing since I had a look into the 10th edition of "Systema Naturae" and could not come up with one clue on the 3 pages covering "neuroptera".

    11 days ago • edited: 6 days ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Sympetrum":

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    14 days ago • deleted: 13 days ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Graphium sarpedon nipponus":

    @Katja Schulz: Katja Schulz. Maybe I was able to mend the Papilio xuthus "stuff". Kueda from iNaturalist pointed out that I should not add any info beside the name to the name-section in the observation slot. So I removed that. Still sorting things out and ironing out glitches. Thanks for all the help. ABOUT 11 HOURS AGO

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Graphium sarpedon nipponus":

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    almost 2 years ago • deleted: almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

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    almost 2 years ago • deleted: 21 days ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

    Hi Katja,thanks for the trouble. As for Papilio xuthus, I uploaded it the usual way. What can I do to add the IDs? Would that be the "add ID" tag? Well, the EOL Papilio xuthus taxon is well stacked with info so nobody is in a hurry.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Graphium sarpedon nipponus":

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    almost 2 years ago • deleted: almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Ascalohybris subjacens (Walker, 1853)":

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    almost 2 years ago • deleted: almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

    Hi Scott, thank you for adding an identification to the Ascalohybris on iNaturalist. As for the parasitic fly species I'll try to figure it out myself during the summer vacation. I'd like to have a look at your beetles pictures occasionally but don't know how to do that. I'm not so often on the site and don't follow anyone.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

    Hi Scott. Thanks for the feedback. Yes, I choose to upload through iNaturalist. I haven't figured out the identification-system yet. I've put until now only 2 butterfly species to the observations (different stages of the development) until now and fairly easy to tag ones. Back in Switzerland I've still a beetle collection which I started when I was 10. It came to a standstill when I moved to Japan. I'll look in sometimes in your coleopteric activities. If you need some specific "Japanese beetle info" let me just know please.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Neolitsea sericea (Blume) Tokyo":

    Neolitsea sericea is one of the preferred feeding plants for the caterpillars of the Blue Triangle butterfly Graphium sarpedon in the Tokio region.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Duncan Brown":

    Hi Duncan, My name is Thomas, I am very fascinated by insects, especially by beetles. 1992 I moved to Japan and am still there. We have here a species Geotrupes auratus, which is refered to as dung beetle or "oosenchikogane" in Japanese. Your name "Rainbow Dung Beetle" sounds very nice and spot on concerning the extraordinary range of colours.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

    Thank you for the good advice. I tried Flickr first but the set-up of an account didn't work. Then I tried iNaturalist which was much easier to set up. I created an account and uploaded for a start 2 pictures, one of Graphium sarpedon (adult) though the picture is not too good, a second picture of a chrysalis of the same species, infested by a parasitic fly species. Very considerate of you to help a beginner, I really appreciate it.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on Thomas Karrer's newsfeed:

    @Cyndy Parr: Hi Cyndy, thanks for your comment. Frankly, I am more or less lost and have no idea wether iNaturalist.org oder Flickr.com will be better. Since I am not on any social network sites it will take some time to sort things out and to find my way around. Right now I checked the pictures of just one japanese butterfly species and saw, that no pics of larvae instars or crysalis are online. Maybe I will try to upload just 3 or 4 pics for a start. Do you have a preference of one of the two upload-portals? thomas

    almost 2 years ago

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    Thomas Karrer commented on "Discover Life: Point Map of Ninox scutulata":

    Hi EOL, I am living in Japan and since Entomology is my hobby I'm taking a lot of insect pictures which I would like to share. I read about the contribution conditions and will give it a try. Prof. Wilson started a marvellous project, his books on ants are just wonderful. Best regards thomas karrer

    almost 2 years ago