Barbara Bauer

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    John P. Sullivan joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    8 months ago

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    10 months ago

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    Parks Collins joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    about 1 year ago

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    Rachel Berquist joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    over 1 year ago

  • Profile picture of José R Ferrer-Paris who took this action.

    José R Ferrer-Paris commented on "What is the most efficient way to extract existing knowledge about interactions from the biological literature and the biological community and make it available in a useful fashion on the EOL platform?":

    I am working in a proposal for the Rubenstein Fellowships on this wish, i am focusing in butterfly-hostplant associations, because is one of the few group with extensive data on this regard, but I think the methods can be adapted to other groups/associations. I wonder if there are any interested/potential users in this community that would provide a letter of support for this proposal. Please let me know.

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Barb Banbury who took this action.
    Barb Banbury joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Barbara Bauer who took this action.

    Barbara Bauer commented on Barbara Bauer's newsfeed:

    @Iain Caldwell: Hi Iain, It is great that you are planning on picking up this research question! The IUCN had a workshop where they compiled certain traits which they think could be associated with climate change vulnerability. I made a list of those that are applicable to aquatic organisms (because this is my interest area, and because lot of data are available about fish e.g. on FishBase). I got stuck because many of these traits were not quantifiable/no data available about them. Especially I was wondering how to quantify the contribution of these traits to vulnerability in an objective way... So the issue seems to be harder then I thought but worth to pursue for sure. I am absolutely happy to share with you the workshop report I used as a basis and my list, if you give me your email address. Mine is bbauer_at_geomar.de.

    almost 2 years ago

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    Evangelos Pafilis joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    almost 2 years ago

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    José R Ferrer-Paris joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Iain Caldwell who took this action.

    Iain Caldwell commented on "Barbara Bauer":

    Hi Barbara, Were you thinking of specific physical or behavioural traits that might be associated with vulnerability to climate change when you authored your Research Wish for the Rubenstein Competition? I am interested in applying for the Rubenstein Competition to address the question you authored. I have most recently been working with marine organisms and I know there are several marine species traits that seem to be associated with vulnerability to exploitation and/or habitat degradation (e.g. age at maturity, body size, fecundity, trophic level, speed of growth, pelagic vs. demersal behaviour, and longevity). As part of my PhD dissertation I also tested whether there were any relationships between vulnerability (to exploitation or habitat degradation) and individual movement (swimming capability, home range, or dispersal/migration frequency) among marine benthic fish species. There does seem to be a relationship between vulnerability and dispersal/migration frequency but the relationship differs depending on the threat (exploitation or habitat degradation). I imagine these seemingly important traits for marine species may differ greatly from terrestrial species and may differ between animals and plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, etc. Did you have ideas of other traits that could be important in one or multiple taxonomic groups? I would be interested to hear any additional thoughts you had about this question.

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Iain Caldwell who took this action.
    Iain Caldwell joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Cyndy Parr who took this action.

    Cyndy Parr commented on "EOL Research Ideas":

    @Gihan Sami Soliman: Interesting wish. We had a Google Summer of Code student try to set up image matching a few years ago -- it is a very difficult problem given the wide variety of images across the tree of life. You can already search using any keywords you want (including distribution), but there are a variety of ways a software developer could improve the chances of success. Of course more data would be helpful too. Thanks for expressing the wish!

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Gihan Sami Soliman who took this action.

    Gihan Sami Soliman commented on "EOL Research Ideas":

    I wish there was a way to look up organisms by uploading an image , some morphological attributes or by describing them/ where found for those who come across organisms that they cannot name.

    almost 2 years ago • edited: almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Gihan Sami Soliman who took this action.
    Gihan Sami Soliman joined the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Barbara Bauer who took this action.
    Barbara Bauer added "Meganyctiphanes norvegica (M. Sars, 1857)" to the collection "Aquatic life Norway".

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Horne who took this action.

    John Horne commented on "Approximately how many coral reef associated marine invertebrate species are widespread across the tropical Indo-Pacific?":

    To answer Barbara's question, the size of a species geographic range is a biological feature of importance. Generally, species with large geographic ranges and high dispersal are expected to be less likely to go extinct than species with small geographic ranges and low dispersal. The fossil record of marine invertebrates, such as mollusks and corals that leave behind durable remains, supports this idea. As we look forward to the future, and the gradual demise of coral reef ecosystems understanding the factors that determine species ranges and dispersal are going to be highly relevant to conservation efforts, and to evolutionary ecology. john.horne@gmail.com

    almost 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jon Norenburg who took this action.

    Jon Norenburg commented on "Approximately how many coral reef associated marine invertebrate species are widespread across the tropical Indo-Pacific?":

    For many of the difficult invertebrate phyla most of the species are known only from the type locality, often from single specimens. In many cases it seems to be because we haven't looked elsewhere adequately, but reconciling old species descriptions with newly collected material can be very difficult as well. This wish is one reason why I want to switch to Scratchpads, so I can start collecting specimen-based data and have it available for others to use.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jennifer Hammock who took this action.
    Jennifer Hammock changed the description of the community "EOL Research Ideas".

    about 2 years ago