Maggie Whitson

Botanist

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  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how broad and toothy the leaf is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) has narrower, often less toothy leaves.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is a pretty typical-looking P. heterophylla leaf.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how broad and toothy the leaf is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) has narrower, often less toothy leaves.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is a typical-looking individual of Physalis heterophylla.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how fuzzy it is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) is much less hairy.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how fuzzy it is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) is much less hairy.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how fuzzy it is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) is much less hairy.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how fuzzy it is. Physalis subglabrata (now called Physalis longifolia) is much less hairy.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla. Note how fuzzy it is. Physalis subglabrata has far fewer hairs and looks glabrous (hairless) from a distance.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis subglabrata TALL GROUND CHERRY:

    This is actually Physalis heterophylla (note the hairs that stick straight out from the stem). It grows in the same habitats as P. subglabrata (now P. longifolia) but is a much fuzzier plant.

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on "Utetheisa bella Linnaeus 1758":

    Though Linnaeus recognized them as two different species, it seems that the current practice is to consider U. bella and U. ornatrix to be one and the same. Depending on which reference you look at, though, there still seems to be some variation on whether all the "bella moths" are considered to be U. ornatrix or whether the preferred name should be U. bella.

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of File:Bele-dame Prwaji foyes sepales.JPG:

    The persistent sepals of Atropa, after the berries have come off.

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on "Herbarium Specimen Image":

    This image also pops up under Nicandra, since it was once called Nicandra anomala Link & Otto. However, it is now recognized as being distinctively different from Nicandra (and also from Physalis, where some early botanists tried to place it).

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of Physalis heterophylla:

    The information is generally correct, though I wouldn't say these are easy to ID plants. The attached photos are of Physalis longifolia, not P. heterophylla.

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of White Alder:

    not Ipomoea. Turnera subulata.

    about 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Maggie Whitson who took this action.

    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of White Alder:

    This looks like Turnera subulata (common name White Alder) which was in the Turneraceae and is now in the Passifloraceae (according to the Missouri Botanical Garden's Angiosperm Phylogeny Project).

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on "":

    According to ITIS, this is a database artifact (a misspelling of the genus Quincula), and is not a real name.

    about 2 years ago

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    Maggie Whitson commented on an older version of portrait:

    This looks like a nematode (roundworm, phylum Nematoda) of some sort. They're common little animals in pond water samples.

    about 2 years ago