Geraldine-M Mallet

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  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.
    Michael Wunderli left the community "EOL Discussion Group".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.

    Michael Wunderli commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bob Corrigan: thats exactly what i would like to do.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Kelly O'Donnell: Kelly, it would be trivial to add a "next/previous image" function to that photo page.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Michael Wunderli: That is an interesting use case. What you're looking to do is to have language be a key for different sets of content associated with a collection, right? So in one collection, you could have titles, descriptions, references and annotations in separate languages. If this is what you want just let me know.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.

    Michael Wunderli commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    I was wondering how to handle multilingual collections. until now i just duplicated the collection and made one title in french, italien, german and english, but it's actually exactly the same collection. This makes it complicated for me if i want to change something, i have to go then to all the collections and make the same change several times. i was thinking about putting the not english titels into the collection description. But i wanted to ask first, maybe there is a better solution?

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Kelly O'Donnell who took this action.

    Kelly O'Donnell commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bob Corrigan: I understand how that could be a problem. The Danny Su page is a nicer interface. It still requires two clicks to get to the next image though, but you don't have to wait for a whole page to load, so that's good.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.

    Michael Wunderli commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bob Corrigan: yes, browsing pictures on this page is very fast, even if you don't have a next image button.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    One of the challenges with adding a "next" button to the object page is context: how do we know you're looking at it in the context of the taxon page? The Actual Solution is to envision other ways of looking at photos that allow you to see more of them at once, and move within that visual context faster. For example, give a look at http://eol.dannysu.com - and the explanation page here.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Kelly O'Donnell who took this action.

    Kelly O'Donnell commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Michael Wunderli: A little late to this conversation, but I agree that a "next image" button would be very useful for browsing.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.

    Michael Wunderli commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bob Corrigan: Thank you!

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bob Corrigan who took this action.

    Bob Corrigan commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Michael Wunderli: MIchael, that's a very good idea. I'll take it from here.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Michael Wunderli who took this action.

    Michael Wunderli commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    When i am looking at pictures on eol, i miss a button "next image" i always have to go back to the media overview and choose the next one.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Most of the Birds of America images are on Wikimedia Commons. Some of them are probably already included in our WC import. Those that are not can be made available to EOL by placing them into a WC gallery with a taxonavigation section. For instructions on how to do this, see Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons Tools for Curators.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of jeff betz who took this action.

    jeff betz commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Are any of the illustrations from Audobon's Birds of America on EOL? I tried to find some of the more famous ones, like his golden eagle painting, or american flamingo, but couldn't. The images from his book have been digitized and are available at several sites, including the Audobon society website and the University of Pittsburg, but both are copyrighted. Could either of these be added to EOL?

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jennifer Hammock who took this action.

    Jennifer Hammock commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Do you have a longstanding research question, involving a large number of taxa? Do you suspect the sum of human knowledge contains enough information to provide the answer ? Maybe you’ve never tackled it because it's just way too much work to extract it from its myriad locations? Can EOL help? We need your input on this subject to inform our development priorities and resource allocation in the coming year.

    Tell us the question you want to ask. Tell us the kinds of data you would need, and from where in our collections you think it could be extracted. Visit our Wishes for Research page to learn more and make a wish. Wishes will be posted publicly and priority wishes will be chosen by a vote of the EOL Curator community. The authors of the chosen wishes will be awarded their choice of soon-to-be-coveted, limited-edition EOL themed gear, with our thanks.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of LI SHI who took this action.
    LI SHI joined the community "EOL Discussion Group".

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Robert Guralnick who took this action.

    Robert Guralnick commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Hi Bart, I am one of the people helping to build Map of Life. I wanted to thank you for taking the time to learn about the project and what we hope to accomplish. I think you and Rod have done about as good job as anyone covering the aspirations of the project. Perhaps one missing piece in the discussions below regarding data types is that we see a very high value to species checklists from local area inventories. We have a fair amount of such checklist data already in Map of Life, and more data of that type will be coming.

    With regards to your excellent question about our intents to work with providers, we are VERY actively seeking partnerships, which is ongoing work that we take very seriously. We are making inroads here, and our small but committed group of scientists and developers are in this for the long haul. Both myself and the lead on the project from Yale, Walter Jetz, are deeply passionate and committed to this endeavor and we both have long standing interests in biogeographical questions in places where our knowledge has the most gaps (Southern hemisphere in particular). The process with working with providers, and doing it _carefully_ so that institutions, datasets and records are well described, cited and linkable back to the source, is slow but meaningful work. We have many pragmatic plans for linkages, integration and continuing to provide value to providers, and of course to those who are interested in using Map of Life. I'd be happy to share more about this if interested.

    A final note: We are definitely excited about, and have had ongoing discussions, with field-based citizen science projects. Within Map of Life itself, we have a strong interest in refining range maps based on bringing together these different sources of data. In particular, every time we overlay point occurrences and range maps, we notice inconsistencies. We will be providing soon tools for spatial editing and annotations. This is more a "classification" problem akin to citizen science efforts happening in the Zooniverse, than the field-side, but likely as important. I hope this makes sense. Questions welcome!

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Roderic Page who took this action.

    Roderic Page commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Rob Guralnick and colleagues will be better placed than I to comment, but my understanding is that Mapping Life is indeed aiming to synthesise distributional data from a wide variety of sources, including point observations (which is typically what crowd-sourcing observation sites record) to the polygons used by projects such as the IUCN Redlist (where the data consist of inferred distributions of taxa based on published records, expert opinions and, I suspect, guesswork).

    Note that crowd-sourcing has its own biases, see for example Where is the "crowd" in crowdsourcing? Mapping EOL Flickr photos.

    over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bart C. who took this action.

    Bart C. commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    @Bart C.: Had some time now to dig a little more into Map of Life and try their beta release at http://www.mappinglife.org/ and scanned their publication. It confirms more or less what I was hoping for. In the first place it will strive to gather all known distribution data and provide tools scientists and the general public can use to really understand and work with those data. To model trends, find knowledge gaps, etc. It will be less of a crowd-sourcing tool itself, but more a website that brings data together from different projects, including potentially crowd-sourcing projects like Inaturalist and Observado, although these kind of data are not implemented yet. Which is even more interesting is, if I understand correctly, that they will also develop ways to compare data from one initative to the other and help eachother to verify data. All looks promising and very exiting stuff, but I still hope they won't wait for data to come to them but actively seek all possible providers, including those ones from continental Europe and other parts of the world outside the Anglesaksen countries. With respect to crowd-sourcing initiatives I not only know of Observado but also have seen initiatives in Germany and Nordic countries which could add valuable information, but all with small budgets and hence lousy PR. I am sure there are also possiblilities in Russia, China, Japan, etc. All step by step of course and with many challenges. But my suggestion would be that somebody needs to work on this actively, not just on the sideline, otherwise you will still have a very biased (Anglesaksen/Western) knowledge of the world compared to the total human knowledge. Although, to have no such bias is utopia I guess. Maybe via GBIF?? Sorry if this long discussion seems somewhat off topic, I had to put my thoughts down and like to hear what views on the big picture are circulating in the professional world, as I am just considering myself an amateur.

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bart C. who took this action.

    Bart C. commented on "EOL Discussion Group":

    Can anybody enlighten me about the big picture in creating Map of Life? Apparently supported by eol (see for instance http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-05/new-map-life-see-where-everything-lives-earth-google-maps). The same concept of plotting data on google maps (or similar) already exists for about 5 years (actually for bird sightings within The Netherlands they already use this for about 10 years now). Is Map of Life the project that will join all data they propose (museums, local checklists and research institutions, published studies and global groups like the World Wildlife Fund) +GBIF, and verified data from Inaturalist, observado.org, project noah, Ispot, etc.? Please tell me this initiative is going to actively seek collaboration with above and other organizations to put everything together. Or is this just going to be one in a dozen that thinks that everybody with data to share will be swarming to them because they have the ‘unique’ concept, but end up with just some little part of the data sources? If it is the last case, please pull back your resources. More competition is a waste of time. Real efforts to bring everything together would be so much powerful. Why can’t those museums, research institutions and WWF join and extend something that already exists, like Inaturalist as it is already a partner of EOL? I am used to observado.org by the way and I am not planning to do effort to import and share this with Inaturalist or any other organization, except maybe some pictures via Flickr for EOL ;).

    over 2 years ago • edited: over 2 years ago