Jason Sharp

Florida naturalist

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  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Sula leucogaster (Boddaert, 1783)" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Sula dactylatra Lesson 1831" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Phaethon lepturus Daudin 1802" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Podiceps auritus (Linnaeus, 1758)" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Podilymbus podiceps (Linnaeus, 1758)" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Gavia immer (Brunnich, 1764)" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.
    Jason Sharp added "Gavia stellata" to the collection "Florida Avian".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Stephen Thorpe who took this action.
    Stephen Thorpe added "Scymnus" to the collection "Misplaced EOL Content".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Bruce Carlson who took this action.

    Bruce Carlson commented on "EOL Curators":

    Tried earlier to insert this comment on this thread but it went elsewhere I guess so trying again: FWIW: For fishes, the American Fisheries Society has formulated rules for the common names of all American fishes. Here are a few excerpts from those rules: 4. ...Hyphens, suffixes and apostrophes shall be omitted except where they are orthographically essential, e.g. three-eye flounder (etc.).... 5. Common names shall not be capitalized in text except for those elements that are proper names.... I have an older edition of the AFS's publication "Common and Scientific Names of Fishes" and in it they take up three pages to cover 18 rules regarding using common names. I don't know if they have made changes to these rules in more recent editions.

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Tasirin who took this action.

    John Tasirin commented on "EOL Curators":

    Thank you, Steve. I saw your comments in my email but they did not seem to appear here. I refreshed my browser twice, they did not come up. I wanted also to say that EOL is in a good capacity and position to standardize common names. It is nice to have a place to refer to. A common name for each living organism. I would like to establish one for Indonesia that has more than 400 working, tribal languages.

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of John Tasirin who took this action.

    John Tasirin commented on "EOL Curators":

    I think, I will be happy with "Cape sugar bird", "white oaks", "Plettenberg Bay" and "Capetown".

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jason Sharp who took this action.

    Jason Sharp selected "Dypsis lutescens" to show in Overview on "Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.".

    over 3 years ago

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    Jason Sharp marked the common name "areca palm" in an unknown language from "Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf." as trusted.

    over 3 years ago

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    Jason Sharp added the English common name "Golden Cane Palm" to "Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.".

    over 3 years ago

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    Jason Sharp marked the common name "Madagascar palm" in an unknown language from "Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf." as trusted.

    over 3 years ago

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    Jason Sharp marked the English common name "Golden Butterfly Palm" from "Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf." as trusted.

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    I would argue that most people would write "The forester came over and cut down 3 big oak trees in my woods." If they wanted to be specific they would write "The forester came over and cut down 3 big White Oaks in my woods." And if they were really fussy they would write "The forester came over and cut down 3 big White Oaks (Quercus albus) in my woods." Having published a field guide my fight was with the copy editor who wanted to retain the publishers style. It was only by appealing to the director that the copy editor budged. A lot of what is published is house styles, rather than what makes sense. After all why should it be "Cape sugarbird"? why not cape sugarbird? (this is entirely unpalatable for some reason - Cape is a proper noun and cannot be lower case) Indeed why not Cape Sugarbird (after all it is a proper noun for the bird)? I dont think that this is an issue that we can follow precedence on. As stated below, it depends whether you follow the descriptive noun or Proper Noun route. The trend is certainly - in many popular writings - to go the descriptive route. I think in ignorance by people who dont know better than that there is a fly, and perhaps a green, maybe a blue and perhaps even a brown one. but for anyone who appreciates that there are many species and wants to communicate about these species then descriptive nouns are wholefully inadequate. One of Adam's first tasks was to give Proper Names to the animals and plants: not to merely describe them, but to name them Properly. (And that explains why Fungi are such a pain - they were forgotten and dont have original Proper Names!)

    over 3 years ago • edited: over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "EOL Curators":

    My point about common names is that in the absence of "official names", common names will be in whatever form they are commonly used. I checked a number of North American plant field guides and there are a number of them that capitalize the first letters of common names. However, there are also a number (maybe more?) that capitalize ALL of the letters of the common name in the entries for the taxa (a practice I wouldn't advocate). There are also some which do not capitalize the common names (e.g. Gleason and Cronquist Manual of Vascular Plants which is a pretty standard reference). So there doesn't seem to be a consistent pattern, although perhaps the newer guides do capitalize first letters. ITIS (which I use as a source of names both scientific and common on my website) does not capitalize most common names, although it does for bird species, which I think is a recognition of what is common practice for those taxa. I just don't think that in common usage, people write "The forester came over and cut down 3 big White Oak trees in my woods." They write "The forester came over and cut down 3 big white oak trees in my woods." We may not like that or think it's a good idea, but that is what people do. We are not in a position to legislate common usage.

    over 3 years ago

  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    The loss of the apostrophe is common as words become more commonplace. There are bird examples - I remember - but cannot call them to mind now. But around Cape Town (Cape's Town) we have Devils Peak, Lions Head, Sir Lowrys* Pass, Bettys* Bay, St Sebastian Bay, Jeffreys Bay, Gordons* Bay, Mitchells Plain, Simonstown (or Simons* Town) , Plettenberg Bay , Prince Alfred Hamlet (*on some/many maps still with apostrophe) and so on. So the loss of the apostrophe and the "s" is an ongoing process, although I will concede that the apostrophe is lost easier when the "s" is also dropped - where the "s" is retained many seem to think like you that it cannot just be an s as that implies plural and hence must be aspostrophed.

    over 3 years ago • edited: over 3 years ago